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Course Guide

Registration Information

All enrolled students must register online for the new school year. Online registration replaces the standard check-in process at schools. In order to receive class schedules before school starts, all students enrolled in eligible schools must complete the online process. Online registrations occurs during the summer before the school year begins. Find out more.


Career Technical Education (CTE)

The courses listed are included in the overall curriculum. Actual classes will be offered if there is sufficient enrollment. Courses in the Department meet the Fine and Practical Arts Graduation Requirement. Skills for employment and/or personal use will be developed.

BUSINESS AND COMPUTER TECHNOLOGIES, FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCES, MARKETING, ACE, AND BOLLMAN TECHNICAL EDUCATION CENTER CONTENT STANDARDS

  1. Engage in the transition process from school-to-work.
  2. Participate in experiences which integrate academic principles, concepts and skills for personal and occupational life applications.
  3. Develop occupational and life skills.

HIRE Education (On-the-Job-Training)

Interested students who are enrolled in a pre-approved Career and Technical Education course may choose to participate in HIRE Education (on-the-job-training). In HIRE Education, students have the opportunity to apply their knowledge and skills in the workplace. A HIRE Education Coordinator will work with students to identify and apply for employment opportunities that match their skills and interests and align with the course pathway each student has completed.

Students should not enroll in HIRE Education as a separate class on the course registration selection form. The HIRE Education Coordinator will sign students up after courses have begun each semester.

  • Students must work a minimum of 125 documented hours to earn .5 credit and 250 documented hours for 1.0 credit. A student cannot earn more than .5 credit of HIRE Education (on-the-job-training) per semester.
  • A student may not be enrolled in and/or receive credit for more than one HIRE Education (on-the-job-training) course at a time.
  • A student may not count more than 2.0 HIRE Education (on-the-job-training) credits towards graduation requirements.
  • HIRE Education (on-the-job-training) credit may not be included in nor does it count toward the 6.0 credit total required yearly for each student.

Alternative Cooperative Education (ACE)

Alternative Cooperative Education is the only program at Northglenn High School designed to specifically address the needs of students who are behind in academic credits. In addition to the class credit, job credit is available to students who are successful in their part-time employment. The course curriculum is “life skill based”, and includes units in reading and writing in the workplace, decision-making, job preparation, study skills, financial literacy, career exploration, and career assessment. The class instructors are also job coordinators who visit each student’s job site, complete quarterly work evaluations, and work on job development.

This Career and Technical program has been designed to:

  • Assist students who have not had success in traditional school programs as indicated by lack of academic credits.
  • Develop job readiness skills for students who have little or no job experience.
  • Assist students in meeting NHS graduation requirements, by providing support for all their classes through study skills and tutoring programs along with affective life skills.

The areas of curricular emphasis include: Decision making, pre-career and technical job skills, general career interest assessment, self-esteem, career and technical guest speakers, career and technical math, job simulation, time management, study skills, work-related issues, post-secondary transitions, extensive career interest assessment, consumer education, credit, banking, investing, college tours and problem solving. (T) Projects, job applications and career research are completed using technology. Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others. Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information. (E) Entrepreneurial-Students will design a social enterprise where a product will be created, produced and marketed. (M) Students will participate in a variety of activities involving mathematics and personal financial literacy including Junior Achievement Finance Park, The Game of Money (personal finance), and the financial management of their social enterprise.

Counseling Notes:

  1. A student may not receive HIRE Education credit for more than one career and technical class at a time.
  2. Students may earn up to one additional credit for 250 documented work hours and successful course completion, a .5 credit for 125 hours.
  3. Credit may be awarded as needed to meet requirements in Fine/Practical Arts or Electives.
  4. Entrance into the program is only for students who are at least one semester behind in credit toward graduation, (3 credits behind).

ACE - WES
Alternative Cooperative Education Special Needs

All ACE/WES classes help students meet the Indicator 13 requirements

ACE-WES 1 – 0804

10, 11

Credit: 1 elective credit for the class and up to 1 elective credits for work experience (Elective Credit) (1.0 for the class; 0.5-1.0 for on-the-job training)

This program will introduce you to the world of work. Units in the class include career interest surveys, career exploration, vocabulary used on the job, work readiness skills, and work place expectations. Students will begin to compile a portfolio to be completed by their senior year to develop a transition plan. Students will see the connection between the academics they are learning and work place needs; reading/writing on the job along with math used in the workplace.

Counseling Notes:

  1. Permission is required by the instructor or case manager.
  2. Students must have an active IEP or 504 plan.
  3. This course may be taken for Fine and Practical Arts or Elective credit.
  4. Students MAY NOT count more than two work credits from Career and Technical courses towards graduation.

BUSINESS AND COMPUTER TECHNOLOGIES

Business Program Description – The business program provides students with a combination of business expertise and employability skills that prepare students to successfully face the challenges and opportunities encountered in today’s business environment. Through an active Advisory Committee of business professionals and close relationships with employers, the program is continuously aligned to meet the current demands of today’s business organizations. In addition, students are encouraged to join Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA). FBLA is the largest business organization in the world. Through FBLA students have the opportunity to compete in business related events, develop valuable leadership skills, and participate in career development programs.

Students enrolled in Business courses will have the option to receive job credit.Hire Education).

Counseling Notes:

  1. A student may not receive Hire Education credit for more than one class at a time.
  2. A student may not count more than two work credits from courses toward graduation. If a student is planning to graduate in January, he/she needs permission from the instructor to enroll in the course.
  3. Job credit is given only at the end of the year upon successful completion of the requirements. Students should have afternoons available for on-the-job training and work duties.

INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS (T,M)

9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: ½ (CDHE Academic Elective)

Have you ever wondered about the different aspects of business and marketing? Here you will learn about economics, banking, consumer credit, basic business principles, management, marketing, finance, human resources, operations, production and technology. Students will learn from a computer simulation, group projects and class presentations relating to business.

Introduction to Business is recommended for ninth or tenth graders. However, the course can be completed at any time during high school.

(T) Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information. Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage products, solve problems and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources. (M) Students will participate in a variety of activities involving mathematics and personal financial literacy including The Stock Market Experience (Colorado Council for Economic Education) and personal finance simulation.

ACCOUNTING/TAX HELP CO/FBLA (T)

10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 (CDHE-Academic Elective)

This year-long course is half tax preparation and half accounting education. Students are concurrently enrolled at Front Range Community College and earn 6 college credits upon successful completion of the course. Students become certified IRS tax preparers and must pass the IRS certification exam. Students volunteer at least 40 hours at the Tax Help Colorado site at Northglenn High School in the Spring. Students enrolled in Accounting/Tax Help Colorado are required to pay $20 class fee to join FBLA. Whatever career field you are you interested in you need basic accounting/tax skills. An excellent foundation in accounting skills will be established for continuing your education in business. (T) Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information. Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage products, solve problems and make informed decisions using appropriate resources. (M) Good math skills are essential as students will use math and problem solving skills daily.

BUSINESS LAW

10, 11, 12 Credit: ½ (CDHE-Academic Elective)

Do you really understand our legal system? This course is beneficial to all students. It provides a foundation for a basic understanding of the law as it pertains to individuals and business. Students will analyze legal issues such as contractual agreements, social responsibilities, minors’ rights and responsibility, employment disputes, and landlord/tenant issues.

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS (T,M)

9, 10, 11,12 Credit: ½ (CDHE-Academic Elective)

This course teaches students advanced computer skills in Microsoft by utilizing word processing, spreadsheets, presentations, software and desktop publications. Note: students will also learn and improve keyboarding skills.

Software units include Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Publisher. This is a great class to enhance all students' technology skills for their high school years and beyond. (T) Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, to support individual learning and the learning of others. Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate and use information. (M) Excel requires students to create equations and reason with equations and inequalities. Students formulate, compute, interpret and validate mathematical expressions.

WEB DESIGN (T,E)

10, 11, 12 Credit ½ (CDHE-Academic Elective)

Students will learn to create, design and publish information on the World Wide Web using state-of-the-art technology. HTML coding will be taught in depth and students will be able to critique business and personal websites for their visual appearance and content. Students will publish various websites using Dreamweaver and other software. Students will alter pictures using PhotoShop software, create their own graphics, and other parts of a functional website. . (T) Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, to support individual learning and the learning of others. Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate and use information. (E) Engineering-Optimize design solutions.

ADVANCED WEB DESIGN (T,E)

11, 12 Credit ½ (CDHE – Academic Elective)

This course continues the skills developed in the Web Design course. Students will learn the skills to create interactive websites, and to utilize state-of-the-art tools to create graphics, animations, and sound. Students will update and maintain the websites for various clubs and organizations at Northglenn High School using Dreamweaver and other software. (T) Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, to support individual learning and the learning of others. Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate and use information. (E) Engineering-Optimize design solutions.

Prerequisite: Web Design or Instructor Approval.

AP COMPUTER SCIENCE PRINCIPLES

10, 11, 12 Credit 1 (CDHE – Academic Elective)

Computer science is everywhere, from our smartphones and video games to music, medicine, and much more. AP Computer Science Principles (AP CSP) can help you understand how computing and technology influence the world around you. Learn how to creatively address real-world issues while using the same tools and processes that artists, writers, computer scientists, and engineers use to bring ideas to life.

AP Computer Science Principles offers a multidisciplinary approach to teaching the underlying principles of computation. The course will introduce students to the creative aspects of programming, abstractions, algorithms, large data sets, the Internet, cybersecurity concerns, and computing impacts.

  1. Northglenn High School requires all advanced placement students to take the AP exam. The current fee for each AP exam is $94.00, but is subject to change based on the College Board. Financial aid is available for students who need assistance.

MARKETING / DECA COURSES

Marketing Education is a career and technical program designed for students who are entrepreneurs and/or interested in preparing to enter occupations in areas such as marketing management, sales, hotel and restaurant management, retailing, travel and tourism, finance and investments, advertising, and distribution.  DECA, the marketing club for students enrolled in marketing courses, provides many opportunities for developing leadership, marketing and business skills through participation in local, regional and national conferences.   A variety of club activities; some social and others encouraging community involvement, take place each year.  Students enrolled in any Marketing class are required to pay $20.00 in annual membership dues to affiliate with the state and national DECA organizations.  Opportunities to raise this money with chapter fund-raising activities will be available to students who choose to pay dues using this method.  Marketing courses completed by Northglenn High School students can be used for advanced placement at all Colorado community colleges.  Marketing and Marketing Strategies are needed to complete all of the competencies required for a Marketing Specialist Certificate.

MARKETING / DECA (T,E,M)

10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 (CDHE-Academic Elective)

Up to 1 credit for HIRE Education is also available

Thinking about a career in marketing, management, sales, or merchandising? In marketing, students will learn job application and interview techniques, basic sales skills, marketing math, economics, pricing and international marketing. Students will learn marketing and business economics by running their own businesses with the assistance of computer simulations and working in the school coffee shop. Marketing students are strongly encouraged to participate in the many DECA activities provided to them throughout the year where they will learn valuable leadership and social skills. (T) Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others. Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information. (E) Entrepreneurial-Students have opportunities to apply marketing skills to improve or solve problems for local businesses. Students may also pursue the development of their own business plan as part of DECA. (M) Students will participate in a variety of activities involving mathematics and personal financial literacy including consumer math and cashiering as well as interpreting data collected during marketing research.

Counseling Notes:

  1. A student may not be enrolled in HIRE Education for more than one career and technical education class at a time.
  2. A student may not count more than two work credits from career and technical courses towards graduation.

MARKETING STRATEGIES / DECA (T,E,M)

11, 12 Credit: 1 (CDHE-Academic Elective)

Up to 1 credit for HIRE Education is also available.

Along with learning about career opportunities in marketing occupations, students will learn about promotion and advertising, finance and investments, presentation skills, management techniques, sports marketing, and establishing and operating a small business. Marketing concepts are learned and applied using computer simulations and playing fantasy football. Marketing students are strongly encouraged to participate in the many DECA activities provided to them throughout the year where they will develop valuable leadership and social skills. (T) Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others. Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information. (E) Entrepreneurial-Students will have opportunities to apply marketing skills to improve or solve problems for local businesses. Students may also pursue the development of their own business plan as part of DECA. (M) Students will participate in a variety of activities involving mathematics and personal financial literacy including consumer math and cashiering as well as interpreting data collected during marketing research.

Counseling Notes:

  1. A student may not be enrolled in HIRE Education for more than one career and technical education class at a time.
  2. A student may not count more than two work credits from career and technical courses towards graduation.

ADVANCED MARKETING / DECA

11, 12 Credit: 1 (CDHE-Academic Elective)

This year-long class is for students interested in furthering their study of marketing and earning college credit from UCD. The class is being offered in cooperation with the University of Colorado-Denver. The parameters are defined and decided by the UCD “Stay Ahead-CU Succeed Program”. The class will carry 6 semester hours of credit from UCD and will have extensive note taking, reading and writing assignments relating to Management, Marketing and Economics. The class is team taught with a professor from UCD. There will be one section of this class offered at Northglenn. Marketing students are strongly encouraged to participate in the many DECA activities provided to them throughout the year. UCD per hour college credit fee is decided by UCD.

Counseling Notes:

  1. Requires instructor approval.
  2. An application submitted by student must be approved by instructor to enroll in course.
  3. Application available in room 318 & counseling office.

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT/ ENTREPRENEURSHIP / DECA (T,E,M)

11, 12 Credit: ½ (CDHE-Academic Elective)

This course introduces students to the rewards and risks of owning, operating, and managing a business enterprise. Emphasis is placed on the mastery of skills needed to plan, organize, manage, and finance a small business. Students will acquire these skills and concepts through development of a business plan, and implementing management strategies through the DECA Coffee Shop (school store). (T) Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others. Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information. (E) Entrepreneurial-Students will conduct market research and write a business plan for a real or hypothetical new business venture. To the extent possible, students will vet their business plan (market research, marketing plan, financial plan and operations plan) with real business professionals. (M) Students will collect, analyze and interpret market research data. Using Excel requires students to create equations and reason with equations and inequalities. Students formulate, compute, interpret and validate mathematical expressions. Marketing students are strongly encouraged to participate in the many DECA activities provided throughout the year. Membership fee for DECA is required ($20.00). Recommended Prerequisite: Marketing

Marketing students are strongly encouraged to participate in the many DECA activities provided throughout the year.

Counseling Notes:

  1. A student may not be enrolled in HIRE Education for more than one career and technical education class at a time.
  2. A student may not count more than two work credits from career and technical courses towards graduation.

Family and Consumer Sciences

Family and Consumer Sciences - Courses prepare students for issues they will be facing in the near future as young adults. Today’s students need to have the current skills to successfully manage his/her life. Family and Consumer Sciences addresses such issues as learning to maintain a budget, career exploration, examining issues in the outside world, establishing goals within their personal life and working towards achieving them.

Family and Consumer Sciences curriculum empowers individuals and families across their life span to cope with the challenges of living and working in a diverse worldwide society. Our focus is on interpersonal relationships within families, work, and community. Courses prepare students for issues they will be facing in the near future as young adults. Family and Consumer Science students are encouraged to participate in FCCLA activities which promote leadership development, creative and critical thinking, and practical knowledge

Food Science (S,T,E,M)

10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 / On the Job Training: 1 Credit

Food Science, Dietetics and Nutrition course will use concepts and principles that include chemistry, microbiology, and physics to study the nature of foods, the causes of deterioration, the principles underlying food processing, and the improvement of foods for the consuming public. Students will apply the food technology of food science to the selection, preservation, processing, packaging, distribution, and use of safe, nutritious, and wholesome food. Students will connect the idea that food science and food technology are often used interchangeably. This course will benefit students because it will bring concepts and principles of science and technology to real life situations that affect the entire world. Math, science, and technology are integrated in to the curriculum. This course is designed around problem based learning and students will understand how the scientific process is used to develop new products in any field.

  • Develop and learn the process of food chemistry and food production.
  • Analyze the science of nutrition.
  • Demonstrate research and development of chemical reactions.

Counseling Notes:

    1. Students will be required to pay a $20.00 lab fee.

CULINARY ESSENTIALS I (S,T,E,M)

9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: ½

This course is designed to introduce students to a variety of culinary skills and food preparation. Through instruction and culinary lab practice, this class will provide an opportunity for students to learn food preparation and demonstrate food safety. Some topics include introductory culinary skills and preparation of items such as quick breads, yeast breads, and eggs; as well as meal and menu planning, nutrition, and food borne illnesses. Students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate the correct procedures and techniques in introductory culinary labs.
  • Analyze nutritional guidelines and plan menus that are nutritionally balanced.
  • Demonstrate food safety standards.

Counseling Notes:

  1. Students will be required to pay a $20.00 lab fee.
  2. This class must be taken prior to Culinary Essentials II

CULINARY ESSENTIALS II (S,T,E,M)

9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: ½

This intermediate culinary course is designed for students interested in exploring culinary careers, and to advance them to the next level of food preparation. The students will have the opportunity to prepare menu items that involve more detailed procedures, and practice techniques used in the culinary field. They will:

  • Classify pasta types and create fresh pasta dishes.
  • Prepare and evaluate nutritional value of various types of meats.
  • Select herbs and spices to enhance flavors of foods.
  • Apply techniques used in cake and cookie decorating.
  • Develop skills in preparing advanced yeast breads and pastries.
  • Identify the origins and prepare foods from different regions and cultures.
  • Emphasize presentation throughout the course.

Counseling Notes:

  1. Students will be required to pay a $20.00 lab fee.
  2. This class must be taken prior to Catering.

CATERING (S,T,E,M)

10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 / On the Job Training: 1 Credit

Catering is a course for more serious minded students with regards to food preparation. The course is a two semester sequential program designed for students who desire a career in the food service industry or who may want to own their own catering business. The course will train the student to acquire skills in quantity food preparation, planning, food safety, sanitation, and entrepreneurship. In addition, the course will provide field trip experiences and analyze career ladders to pursue further training and education. Catering students will develop a business plan and are able to invest financially in the business for a wage earning opportunity.

Counseling Notes:

  1. Students will be required to pay a $20.00 lab fee.
  2. Students must pass Culinary Essentials 1 or Culinary Essentials 2 with a C or better to be enrolled in Catering.
  3. Students may earn 1 credit for every 250 hours of documented, paid/job/internship experience, up to 2.0 credit per year and student must pass the class in order to receive the optional job/internship credit
  4. Student may not be enrolled in and /or receive job/internship credit for more than one co-op class at a time. Student may not count more than 2.0 job/internship credits.
  5. Students are encouraged to participate in FCCLA activities, which promote leadership development, creative and critical thinking skills and practical knowledge.

FASHION DESIGN & MERCHANDISING (S,T,E,M)

9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 / On the Job Training: 1 Credit

Fashion Design and Merchandising exposes students to various aspects of the fashion design and merchandising industry. Students integrate knowledge, skills and practices to evaluate potential career opportunities. Areas of focus include:

  • Introduction to Fashion
  • Fashion Selection
  • Fashion Textiles
  • Textile Product Construction
  • Fashion Merchandising

Activities and best practices incorporate oral and written communication skills, team building skills, and portfolio development.

Counseling Notes:

  1. Students will be required to pay a $20.00 lab fee.
  2. Students may earn 1 credit for every 250 hours of documented, paid job/internship experience, up to 2.0 credits per year and student must pass the class in order to receive the optional job/internship credit.
  3. Students may not be enrolled in and /or receive job/internship credit for more than one co-op class at a time. Students may not count more than 2.0 job/internship credits from courses towards graduation.
  4. Students are encouraged to participate in FCCLA activities, which promote leadership development, creative and critical thinking skills and practical knowledge.

INTERIOR DESIGN (T,E,M)

9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 / On the Job Training: 1 Credit

Interior design students will learn to evaluate, select, and estimate costs of setting up a first apartment and understand the legal agreements involved. Students will learn to create comfortable, pleasant surroundings based on personal needs, furniture selection, background selection, and accessories. Students will complete a project to accessorize their own living space.

  • Create small home accessory projects.
  • Apply principles and elements of design.
  • Present culminating projects.
  • Design and present a floor plan of a living space.

Counseling Notes:

  1. Students will be required to pay a $20.00 lab fee.
  2. Students may earn 1 credit for every 250 hours of documented, paid job/internship experience, up to 2.0 credits per year and student must pass the class in order to receive the optional job/internship credit.
  3. Students may not be enrolled in and /or receive job/internship credit for more than one co-op class at a time. Students may not count more than 2.0 job/internship credits from courses towards graduation.
  4. Students are encouraged to participate in FCCLA activities, which promote leadership development, creative and critical thinking skills and practical knowledge.

ADULT LIVING (T,E)

11, 12 Credit: 1

Adult Living includes Life Management and Relationships in a yearlong course that will prepare students for real life.

LIFE MANAGEMENT

Do you plan to live on your own? Will you be able to make responsible decisions about everyday life situations? Life Management is a course that is designed to help students make the transition from high school to adulthood. Areas of study include:

  • College/career planning.
  • Management of credit and finances.
  • Problem solving and decision making skills.
  • Development and practice of good consumer skills.

RELATIONSHIPS

Relationships is a course in communications, relationships, life crisis and preparation for various stages of life. Areas of study will include the application of:

  • Adult communication skills.
  • Evaluating the impact of life crisis on individuals and the family.
  • Explaining the stages and transitions between life cycles. (Single life, dating, marriage, parenting, death and dying.)

Students enrolled in Adult Living class are required to pay $15.00 in annual membership dues to affiliate with the state and national FCCLA organizations. Opportunities to raise this money with chapter fund-raising activities will be available to students who choose to pay dues using this method.

CHILD AND ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT (S,T,E)

9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: ½

This course distinguishes the uniqueness of the child in context of family, school, culture and language. It also evaluates the growth and development of children and focuses on parenting practices. Students will:

  • Examine physical, health and motor development of children.
  • Compare how children learn differently between ages 2-12.
  • Connect intellectual and social/emotional development to age and abilities of children.

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (S,T,E)

10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 / On the Job Training: 1 Credit

Early Childhood Education class provides career training so students gain entry level skills in childcare and childcare related occupations. In this class, students will learn growth/development, how to plan and organize lessons, develop skills needed when working with children, family/community relationships, and professionalism. Students will attend a preschool program on a regular basis to apply and demonstrate their skills in working with children.

Students enrolled in Early Childhood Education class are required to pay $15.00 in annual membership dues to affiliate with the state and national FCCLA organizations. Opportunities to raise this money with chapter fund-raising activities will be available to students who choose to pay dues using this method.

  • An understanding of different areas of education including lesson planning, thematic units, children’s art, music, literature, science, and math will be demonstrated within the preschool classroom.
  • Students have the opportunity to earn an additional credit for the year upon successful completion of 140 hours of volunteer work at an elementary school. This volunteer experience will be under the supervision and guidance of an elementary school teacher. Transportation is not provided. Placement of training site will be coordinated with student’s schedule at Northglenn High School.
  • The student also has the option to earn an elective job credit by working in a childcare center or an after school program during the year. This credit will be rewarded at the end of the year upon successful employment.

Counseling Notes:

  1. Students may earn 1 credit for every 250 hours of documented, paid job/internship experience while working in a childcare center or an after school program (up to 1.0 credits per year) and a credit will be rewarded at the end of the year upon successful employment. A student may not be enrolled in and or receive credit for the same job from more than one career and technical co-op class at a time.
  2. A student may not count more than two work credits from career and technical courses towards graduation.
  3. FCCLA activities are integrated into the Early Childhood Education program, which promote leadership development, creative and critical thinking skill and practical knowledge.

POSITIVE LIFE SKILLS (E)

9,10,11,12 Credit: ½

Special needs students will have the opportunity to learn independent life skills with the assistance of a peer aide under the supervision of the paraprofessionals and teacher. Life skills include self-help skills and activities in the areas of health, safety and nutrition, clothing care, and home decorating.

Counseling Notes:

  1. Permission is required from the instructor.
  2. Fine Art Credit
  3. Student must have a current IEP to enroll.
  4. Students will be required to pay a $5.00 supply/lab fee.

POSITIVE LIFE SKILLS/PEER TUTOR (E)

10, 11, 12 Credit: ½

Experience the reward of helping others learn and practice Life Skills. Work one on one with special needs students to help them learn and practice independent life skills.

Counseling Notes:

  1. Students must verbally apply to the teacher or to their counselor.
  2. Students will be required to pay a $5.00 supply/lab fee.

COMMUNITY SERVICE LEARNING /LITERACY LEADERS (E)

9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: ½

Do you want to become a teacher? You can volunteer at learning sites such as preschools, elementary schools, and middle schools. Students can earn elective credit for community service learning. In addition to their contribution to the community, students must maintain a log of their activities/work and will be evaluated on their performance at mid-term and quarter. Students are expected to log in 90 hours in order to receive ½ credit service learning elective credit. A contract is established between the student and their community service sponsor to establish expectations. For more information, contact the Counseling Center.

Counseling Notes:

1. Only one service learning credit may count towards graduation.


English Department

Counseling Notes:

  1. Four credits of English are required for graduation, one credit per year.
  2. Courses with asterisks (*) require teacher recommendation.
  3. Students may move between levels of challenge, pending teacher recommendation.
  4. All juniors and seniors are required to take a year-long literature course.
  5. AP classes receive 5.0 weighting on the student’s GPA.

ENGLISH CONTENT STANDARDS

  1. Oral Expression and Listening
  2. Reading for All Purposes
  3. Writing and Composition
  4. Research and Reasoning
  5. Specific grade-level content standards can be found on the Adams 12 Five Star Schools website.

ENGLISH 9 LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION (T,E)

9 Credit: 1 (CDHE-English, NCAA-English)

In this course, students will explore their own cultural identities as well as the cultural identities of people from around the world through the study of literature both within and outside of the United States. They will also understand how experiences and cultural expectations shape attitudes. Students will solve problems, analyze language, and provide supporting evidence in order to communicate clearly in both writing and speaking. This course builds upon students’ prior knowledge of grammar, vocabulary, word usage, and the mechanics of writing and usually includes the four aspects of language reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Typically, this class introduces and defines various genres of literature; writing exercises are often linked to reading selections.

COLLEGE-PREPARATORY ENGLISH 9 LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION (T,E)

9 Credit: 1 (CDHE-English, NCAA-English)

College-Preparatory English 9 is a year-long course offered for students who desire a more challenging learning opportunity. In this course, students will explore their own cultural identities as well as the cultural identities of people from around the world through the study of literature both within and outside of the United States. They will also understand how experiences and cultural expectations shape attitudes. Students will solve problems, analyze language, and provide supporting evidence in order to communicate clearly in both writing and speaking. This course builds upon students’ prior knowledge of grammar, vocabulary, word usage, and the mechanics of writing and usually includes the four aspects of language reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Typically, this class introduces and defines various genres of literature; writing exercises are often linked to reading selections.

Counseling Notes:

  1. This course is available to students who received an “A” or “B” in eighth grade English and/or by teacher recommendation.
  2. TCAP proficiency will be considered.

ENGLISH 10 LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION (T)

10 Credit: 1 (CDHE-English, NCAA-English)

This course will focus on a literary exploration of human thought and the great ideas that humanity has expressed through literature. The “Big Ideas” are as follows: The individual within or versus society, the creation/organization of society/government, social justice, ethics, and innovation/exploration. Students will participate in a variety of inquiry-based learning activities and discussions. They will write narrative, informative, and persuasive, and analytical pieces, and read to explore the relationship between a work’s historical or cultural context and the impact of the work itself. Readings will include a range of literature from the U.S. and around the world. This course offers a balanced focus on composition and literature. Typically, students learn about the alternate aims and audiences of written compositions by writing persuasive, critical, and creative multi-paragraph essays and compositions. Through the study of various genres of literature, students can improve their reading rate and comprehension and develop the skills to determine the author’s intent and theme and to recognize the techniques used by the author to deliver his or her message.

COLLEGE-PREPARATORY ENGLISH 10 LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION (S,T)

10 Credit: 1

(CDHE-English, NCAA-English)

College-Preparatory English 10 is a year-long course designed for sophomores who desire a more challenging learning opportunity. This course will focus on a literary exploration of human thought and the great ideas that humanity has expressed through literature. The “Big Ideas” are as follows: The individual within or versus society, the creation/organization of society/government, social justice, ethics, and innovation/exploration. Students will participate in a variety of inquiry-based learning activities and discussions. They will write narrative, informative, and persuasive, and analytical pieces, and read to explore the relationship between a work’s historical or cultural context and the impact of the work itself. Readings will include a range of literature from the U.S. and around the world. This course offers a balanced focus on composition and literature. Typically, students learn about the alternate aims and audiences of written compositions by writing persuasive, critical, and creative multi-paragraph essays and compositions. Through the study of various genres of literature, students can improve their reading rate and comprehension and develop the skills to determine the author’s intent and theme and to recognize the techniques used by the author to deliver his or her message.

Counseling Notes:

  1. This course is available to students who received an “A” or B” in ninth grade English and/or by teacher recommendation.
  2. TCAP proficiency will be considered.
  3. This course is integrated with AP World History. Students taking AP World History must enroll in CP English 10 to experience the most beneficial learning experience. In integrated courses paired teams of teachers share the same groups of students in each integrated class.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENGLISH LANGUAGE & COMPOSITION (S,T)

11 Credit: 1

(CDHE-English, NCAA-English) (Weighted 5.0)

AP English Language & Composition is a year-long course approved by The College Board, which states, “An AP course in English Language and Composition engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts, and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Both their writing and their reading should make students aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects as well as the way generic conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing.” This course focuses on the study of nonfiction, close reading, and effective, persuasive, college-level writing. Students are expected to complete summer reading assignments and take the national Advanced Placement English Language and Composition exam offered in May which can result in college credit.

Counseling Notes:

  1. Northglenn High School requires all advanced placement students to take the AP exam. The current fee for each AP exam is $93.00, but is subject to change based on The College Board. Financial aid is available for students who need assistance.
  2. All seniors are required to take one of the year-long senior seminar literature courses or AP literature and composition.

ENGLISH 11: AMERICAN LITERATURE & COMPOSITION (T,E)

11 Credit: 1 (CDHE-English, NCAA-English) ½ credit per semester

This course will focus on the development of literary theme and structure across the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries in the United State in order for students to understand the thematic progression of American literature. Students will participate in a variety of inquiry-based learning activities and verbal activities as well as write narrative, comparative analysis, informative, and persuasive pieces. This course focuses upon commonly known American authors and their work. Students improve their critical-thinking skills as they determine the underlying assumptions and values within the selected works and as they understand how the literature reflects the society of the time. Oral discussion is an integral part of this literature course, and written compositions (formal/persuasive research, literary analyses, etc.) are often required

ENGLISH 11: COLLEGE-PREPARATORY AMERICAN LITERATURE & COMPOSITION (T,E)

11 Credit: 1 (CDHE-English NCAA-English)

College-preparatory American Literature and Composition is a year-long course designed for Juniors who desire a more challenging learning opportunity. This course will focus on the development of literary theme and structure across the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries in the United States in order for students to understand the thematic progression of American literature. Students will participate in a variety of inquiry-based learning activities and verbal activities as well as write narrative, comparative analysis, informative, and persuasive pieces. This course focuses upon commonly known American authors and their work. Students improve their critical-thinking skills as they determine the underlying assumptions and values within the selected works and as they understand how the literature reflects the society of the time. Oral discussion is an integral part of this literature course, and written compositions (formal/persuasive research, literary analyses, etc.) are often required

Counseling Notes:

  1. This course is available to students who received an “A” or B” in Sophomore English and/or by teacher recommendation.
  2. TCAP proficiency will be considered.

AP CAPSTONE

11 Credit: 1

AP Capstone™ is a College Board program that equips students with the independent research, collaborative teamwork, and communication skills that are increasingly valued by colleges. It cultivates curious, independent, and collaborative scholars and prepares them to make logical, evidence-based decisions.

AP Capstone is comprised of two AP courses — AP Seminar and AP Research — and is designed to complement and enhance the discipline-specific study in other AP courses. Participating schools can use the AP Capstone program to provide unique research opportunities for current AP students, or to expand access to AP by encouraging students to master the argument-based writing skills that the AP Capstone program develops.

AP CAPSTONE: SEMINAR

(Juniors only; Recommended English course for students on a PLTW or “By Design” pathway)

11 Credit:1

AP Seminar is a foundational course that engages students in cross-curricular conversations that explore the complexities of academic and real-world topics and issues by analyzing divergent perspectives. Using an inquiry framework, students practice reading and analyzing articles, research studies, and foundational, literary, and philosophical texts; listening to and viewing speeches, broadcasts, and personal accounts; and experiencing artistic works and performances. Students learn to synthesize information from multiple sources, develop their own perspectives in written essays, and design and deliver oral and visual presentations, both individually and as part of a team. Ultimately, the course aims to equip students with the power to analyze and evaluate information with accuracy and precision in order to craft and communicate evidence-based arguments.   The second course of AP Capstone, AP Research, will be offered to seniors beginning Fall 2018.  AP Seminar is a prerequisite for taking AP Research.

AP Capstone:  Research 

(Seniors only; Recommended English course for students on a PLTW pathway)

12 Credit: 1

AP Research, the second course in the AP Capstone experience, allows students to deeply explore an academic topic, problem, issue, or idea of individual interest. Students design, plan, and implement a year-long investigation to address a research question. Through this inquiry, they further the skills they acquired in the AP Seminar course by learning research methodology, employing ethical research practices, and accessing, analyzing, and synthesizing information. Students reflect on their skill development, document their processes, and curate the artifacts of their scholarly work through a process and reflection portfolio. The course culminates in an academic paper of 4,000–5,000 words (accompanied by a performance, exhibit, or product where applicable) and a presentation with an oral defense.

 Pre-Requisite:  AP Seminar

(Note: AP Seminar is a prerequisite for AP Research. Completing AP Seminar and all its required assessment components is necessary for students to develop the skills to be successful in AP Research.)

ENGLISH 12: MULTICULTURAL LITERATURE OR HUMANITIES

Students will engage in the study of literary movements to determine how various views affect the interpretation and understanding of literature, including pieces of classical and foundational world literature. They will also understand how works of literature are influenced by the time period in which the author lived and how that influence is reflected in the work. Students will participate in independent inquiry in which they reflect upon how their own choices and actions affect how they are perceived in the world as well as how they are influenced by the time in which they live.

ENGLISH 12 LITERATURE AND COMPOSTION : MULTICUTURAL LITERATURE (T)

2 Credit: 1

(CDHE-English, NCAA-English) ½ credit per semester

Multicultural Literature and Composition is designed to present a study of diverse literatures and cultures. Literature and culture are linked as students discover how cultural universals are expressed and influenced by history and geography. Students consider their positions as “global citizens” appreciative of other cultures and people. This course offers students the opportunity to study and reflect upon the themes presented in the body of literature being presented. Students improve their critical-thinking skills as they determine the underlying assumptions and values within the selected works; study how the literature reflects the land, society, and history of the region; and may study the influence of this literature on others. Oral discussion is an integral part of literature courses, and written compositions (formal/persuasive research, literary analyses, and college essays) are often required.

ENGLISH 12 LITERATURE AND COMPOSTION : HUMANITIES (T,E)

12 Credit: 1 (CDHE-English, NCAA- English) ½ credit per semester

Humanities is a course designed to address the question, “What does it mean to be human?” and studies historically important attempts to answer this question. The course addresses four major modes of this expression: philosophy, world religion, art, and literature. The course explores each mode through important, diverse movements and ideas in human thought, which are generally transitions between old and new ways of seeing and understanding. Students determine the underlying assumptions and values within the selected works, reflect upon the influence of societal events and social attitudes, and compare the points of view of various authors and thinkers. Oral discussion is an integral part of literature courses, and written compositions (formal/persuasive research, literary analyses, and college essays) are often required.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENGLISH LITERATURE & COMPOSITION (S,T)

12 Credit: 1 (CDHE-English, NCAA-English) (Weighted 5.0)

AP English Literature & Composition is a year-long course approved by The College Board, which states, “An AP English Literature and Composition course engages students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of selected texts, students deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style, and themes as well as such smaller-scale elements as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone.” This course focuses on the study of fiction, poetry, drama, close reading, and effective, analytical, college-level writing. Students are expected to complete summer reading assignments and take the national Advanced Placement English Literature & Composition examination, which can result in college credit.

Counseling Notes:

  1. A College Preparatory Composition course or Advanced Placement English Language is recommended, but not required to take Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition. The current fee for each AP exam is $93.00, but is subject to change based on the College Board. Financial aid is available for students who need assistance.

ENGLISH ELECTIVES: Students who choose to take one of the English elective classes listed below must be concurrently enrolled in a year-long senior seminar literature course or AP literature and composition.

CREATIVE WRITING (T)

12 only Credit: ½ (CDHE-English, NCAA-English)

Creative Writing is a semester-long course that offers students the opportunity to develop and improve their technique and individual style in poetry, short story, drama, essays, and other forms of prose. The emphasis of the courses is on writing; however, students may study exemplary representations and authors to obtain a fuller appreciation of the form and craft. Students write about subjects of their choice and contemporary issues relevant to their lives. Students present oral essays based on their writing, multimedia presentations, and participate in Socratic seminars. Additional activities include keeping a journal, close reading, analyzing mentor texts, examining literary techniques, and sharing their work with other students. Students are expected to develop distinct voice, style and tone in their writing.

LITERATURE TO FILM (T)

12 only Credit: ½ (CDHE-English)

This course examines the relationship between literature and film. Students will read several novels, examine the corresponding film adaptations and analyze the similarities and differences between the written word and filmmaking. Throughout the course, students will also produce a variety of written pieces in several modalities. Novels and their film counterparts will be chosen from a variety of literary movements and literature that includes pieces of classical, foundational world literature. Students will understand how works of literature and films are influenced by the time periods in which the authors, producers, or directors lived and how that influence is reflected in the works, and apply this understanding when reflecting upon their own writing. Additional texts will include nonfiction that supports the students’ exploration of the historical background of the novels or films. Students will participate in independent inquiry based on a students’ independent choice of topics related to a novel, biography, or autobiography that has been also represented in a film.

This course has the same aim as a general literature courses (to improve students’ language arts and critical-thinking skills), but uses selected pieces of literature and film to explore a particular theme as expressed from several points of view. Such themes might include The American Dream, Society and Self, Exploration, War and Peace, and the like. Oral discussion is an integral part of this course, and written compositions (formal/persuasive research, literary analyses, and college essays) are often required.

SPEECH (T)

12 only Credit: ½ (CDHE-English, NCAA-English)

Speech is a semester-long course designed to introduce students to a wide variety of speaking experiences. Students learn how to plan, organize, and deliver various kinds of speeches for the purpose of informing, persuading, entertaining and demonstrating materials. Students complete additional work in original oratory, extemporaneous speaking, and debates of contemporary topics. Students also develop skills in oral interpretation which includes selection, preparation and oral presentation of literary material, including drama, prose, and poetry. Active participation in simulation work is encouraged.

Public Speaking courses enable students, through practice, to develop communication skills that can be used in a variety of speaking situations (such as small and large group discussions, delivery of lectures or speeches in front of audiences, and so on). Course topics may include (but are not limited to) research and organization, writing for verbal delivery, stylistic choices, visual and presentation skills, analysis and critique, and development of self-confidence.

ELD-English Language Development

9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 (2 years of ELD may count for CDHE English Credit)

ELD is for students who are not considered first language English speakers. Our program has four levels including beginning courses for non-English speakers through Transitional English for students who speak English fluently, but are still below grade level in reading and writing. All courses are designed to develop skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing the English Language for both social skills and particularly academic language skills. The courses are all aligned to the WiDA language proficiency standards. The WiDA standards support academic language development and academic achievement for linguistically diverse learners. The WiDA standards are also the designated standards used to demonstrate proficiency on the ACCESS language assessment. Placement for language classes are determined by ACCESS test scores, PARCC scores, and teacher recommendation.

Courses:
ELD Beginning English
ELD Intermediate English
ELD Advanced English
ELD Transitional English

Intermediate English (year)/ Advanced English (year)/ Transitional English (year) Students will take one period of ESL English daily and regular classes for the remainder of the day

* All ELD classes may be repeated for credit with permission of the instructor until such time the student is capable of participation in the

standard English classroom.

English Language Development Peer Tutor

9,10,11,12 Elective credit: 1 per year

GPA Excluded

This course is for English speaking students who wish to tutor speakers of other languages. Tutors are scheduled for one period daily to work one-on-one or in small groups with ESL students who are in 9th through 12th grade

Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation, interview, training, and instructor approval.


Fine Arts Courses

The Fine Arts Department includes offerings in Visual Art, Vocal and Instrumental Music, Drama, Dance, Photography and Yearbook. Some experience with classes in the Fine Arts area is highly desirable for all students and is considered to be an essential part of a complete educational experience. All courses in the Fine Arts Department will satisfy the Arts requirement for graduation. Students find the courses in this area to be interesting and personally satisfying.

Below are course the Fine Arts Department offers in the order in which we recommend students take them – In the Visual Arts, students who are interested in studying for all four years should take Foundations of Art in the 9th grade, followed by sequenced classes in specific disciplines. Over the course of their 4 years, students should collect their art and build a portfolio for their AP Studio Art capstone experience.

MUSIC CONTENT STANDARDS

  1. Expression of Music
  2. Creation of Music
  3. Theory of Music
  4. Aesthetic Valuation of Music

VISUAL ART CONTENT STANDARDS

  1. Observe and Learn to Comprehend
  2. Envision and Critique to Reflect
  3. Invent and Discover to Create
  4. Relate and Connect to Transfer

DANCE CONTENT STANDARDS

  1. Students will understand and demonstrate dance skills.
  2. Students will understand and apply the principals of choreography.
  3. Students will create, communicate, and problem solve through dance.
  4. Students will understand and relate the role of dance in culture and history.
  5. Students will understand the benefits of dance for lifelong fitness.
  6. Students will understand the relationships and connections between dance and other disciplines.

THEATRE CONTENT STANDARDS

  1. Create: The creation of drama and theatre is a demonstration of learned skills in forming new theatrical works, interpreting theatrical works for performance and design, and developing characters and analyzing roles.
  2. Perform: The theatre process is a product of the knowledge and essential skills gained in the study of theatre toward the expression of the human experience in story, movement, speech, and staging for an intended audience.
  3. Critically Respond: An informed literacy, ethical judgment, and cultural research are key aspects of theatre arts study. Responding focuses on the artistic and scientific knowledge of conventions, cultures, styles, genres, theories, and technologies needed to know better choices and best practices.

VISUAL ART COURSES

Foundations of Art (9th grade only)
Covers 2D, 3D, and Digital

  Special Programs Positive Art Positive Art Peer Tutor
2D Classes (10th-12th grade) Drawing and Painting I, II, III, IV, V, VI 3D Classes (10th-12th grade) Jewelry I, II, III, IV Ceramics I, II, III, IV Digital Arts Classes (10th-12th grade) Photography I, II, III, IV Graphic Art
AP Studio Art (12th grade ONLY)

FOUNDATIONS OF ART (S.T.E.M)

9 Credit: 1 (CDHE-Academic Elective)

This course provides students with the knowledge and opportunity to explore an art form and to create individual works of art.  It may also provide a discussion and exploration of career opportunities in the art world.  The course covers the language, materials, and processes of a particular art form and the design elements and principles supporting a work of art.  As students advance and become more adept, the instruction regarding the creative process becomes more refined, and students are encouraged to develop their own artistic styles.  Although this course focuses on creation, it may also include the study of major artists, art movements, and styles.  

Foundations of Art offers a solid preparation for experienced art students and a non-threatening experience for the non-art major.  The class teaches visual design and thinking in a variety of disciplines: Drawing/Painting, Pottery, Jewelry and Digital Photography.  As a survey course, this class will enable the student to make informed choices in selecting additional art courses for their continued study.  For students in the Visual Arts Pathway, this class provides the framework for building a capstone portfolio and gallery show to take place during their senior year.

S - We’ll experiment with and seek to understand: metals and heat; photo-chemical reactions in photography and the digital process; the geology of clay; glaze mixtures and their reaction to the firing process; light and color.
T - We’ll approach problems with: creativity and innovation; critical thinking; and through the use of digital technology in research and art making.
E - We create art using a visual design process in order to inquire, define, generate solutions, evaluate work, test solutions, modify our methods and communicate final work.
M - We’ll develop a sense of measurement, proportion, and dimension

2D Classes

DRAWING and PAINTING I (T,E,M)

10, 11, 12 Credit: ½ (CDHE-Academic Elective)

Drawing and Painting courses provide students with the knowledge and opportunity to explore an art form and to create individual works of art with focus on drawing and painting. In keeping with this attention on two-dimensional work, students typically work with several media (such as pen-and-ink, pencil, chalk, watercolor, tempera, oils, acrylics, and so on), but some courses may focus on only one medium. Courses may also provide a discussion and exploration of career opportunities in the art world. Initial courses cover the language, materials, and processes of this art form and the design elements and principles supporting a work of art. Although the focus is on creation, courses may also include the study of major artists, art movements, and styles.

T - creativity and innovation, critical thinking, solving art problems
E - two-dimensional design process including a mini PBL
M - measurement and proportion

Counseling Notes:

  1. This course may be used for Fine Arts or Elective credit.
  2. This course is a prerequisite for Drawing and Painting II.

DRAWING/PAINTING II, III, IV, V, VI (T,E,M)

10, 11, 12 Credit: ½ (CDHE-Academic Elective)

Drawing and Painting courses provide students with the knowledge and opportunity to explore and art form and to create individual works of art with focus on drawing and painting. In keeping with this attention on two-dimensional work, students typically work with several media (such as pen-and-ink, pencil, chalk, watercolor, tempera, oils, acrylics, and so on), but some courses may focus on only one medium. Courses may also provide a discussion and exploration of career opportunities in the art world. As students advance and become more adept, the instruction regarding the creative process becomes more refined, and students are encouraged to develop their own artistic styles.

T - creativity and innovation, critical thinking, solving art problems
E - two-dimensional design process including a PBL
M - measurement and proportion

Drawing/Painting II - Prerequisites: Successful completion of Drawing and Painting I OR Teacher approval.

Counseling Notes: This course may be used for Fine Arts or Elective credit.

Drawing/Painting III – Prerequisites: Successful completion of Drawing/Painting II OR Teacher approval.

Counseling Notes: This course may be taken for Fine Arts or Elective credit.

Drawing/Painting IV – Prerequisites: Successful completion of Drawing/Painting III OR Teacher approval.

Counseling Notes: This course may be taken for Fine Arts or Elective credit.

3D Classes

JEWELRY I, II, III, IV (S,T,E,M)

10, 11, 12 Credit: ½ (CDHE-Academic Elective)

Jewelry courses apply art and design principles to the creation of jewelry. Typically, students explore using a variety of media, such as ceramic, papier-mache, glass, plastic, copper-enameled, brass, and silver. Course topics include exposure to jewelry of diverse world cultures and the history of jewelry design. Some Jewelry courses may concentrate on metalwork processes such as brazing, soldering, casting, welding, riveting, and finishing as they relate to the creation of jewelry.

S - metals and heat
T - creativity and innovation, critical thinking, solving art problems
E - three-dimensional design process
M - measurement and dimension

Jewelry I - Counseling Notes: This course can be used in combination with Jewelry II as a prerequisite for Jewelry III.

  • A materials fee for all students is required. The fee is currently $25.00 and covers basic materials and equipment. If a student chooses to work with more expensive materials than those provided, the student must provide these materials.
  • This course may be taken for Fine Arts or Elective credit.

Jewelry II-IV – Prerequisites: Successful completion of Jewelry I OR Teacher approval.

  • This course can be used in combination with Jewelry I as a prerequisite for

Jewelry III.

  • This course may be taken for Fine Arts of Elective credit.

Ceramics I, II, III, IV (S,T,E,M)

10, 11, 12 Credit: ½ (CDHE-Academic Elective)

Ceramics/Pottery courses cover the same topics as Creative Art—Comprehensive courses, but focus on creating three-dimensional works out of clay and ceramic material. Particular attention is paid to the characteristics of the raw materials, their transformation under heat, and the various methods used to create and finish objects.

At Northglenn High School, the Pottery classes focus on effective techniques to work with and maintain their clay. We’ll work with a range of assignments from personal explorations of elements of pottery to completing jobs for actual clients. Students will work to create work that is a service to others as well as at attempt to challenge their own creativity and skills. Students will have the opportunity to set their own goals and discover their won methods along the way.

S - Students will work to understand clay and glaze mixtures and their reaction to the firing process. These processes involve the geology of clay and an understanding of how heat-work affects the process of creating pottery.
T - Students use digital media to communicate and work collaboratively. Students are able to customize their learning with digital means as well to gather, evaluate and use information that is particular to their interests. Students will be challenged to use technology in creative ways, innovating their own uses and combinations of tools to fit their purposes.
E - The creative process and Studio Habits that students develop parallel the Engineering Design Process explored in the PLTW classes - students Inquire, Define, Generate Solutions, Evaluate their work, Test solutions, Modify their goals and methods and Communicate their final work.
M - Students will develop a sense of proportion and measurement in both the design process and in the practical matters of glaze and clay composition.

Ceramics I - Counseling Notes: This course can be used, in combination with Pottery II, as a prerequisite for Pottery III.

  • A materials fee for all students is required. The fee is currently $25.00 and covers basic materials and equipment. If a student chooses to work with more expensive materials than those provided, the student must provide these materials.
  • This course may be taken for Fine Arts or Elective credit.

Ceramics II-IV - Prerequisite: Successful completion of Ceramics I OR Teacher approval.

Counseling Notes: This course can be used, in combination with Ceramics I, as a prerequisite for Ceramics III.

  • A materials fee for all students is required. The fee is currently $25.00 and covers basic materials andequipment. If a student chooses to work with more expensive materials than those provided, the student must provide these materials.
  • This course may be taken for Fine Arts or Elective credit.

AP Studio Art

11, 12 Credit: 1 (CDHE-Academic Elective)

The AP Studio Art class is the culminating class in the Fine Arts Pathway. Designed for students with a serious interest in art, AP Studio Art is a general portfolio courses, meaning students will use the class to prepare their portfolios for submission to the College Board in: 2D Design (Drawing, Painting, Photography, Graphic Design); 3D Design (Ceramics, Jewelry, Sculpture) or Drawing.  This studio class enables students to refine their skills and create artistic works with emphasis on the quality of work, attention to and exploration of a particular visual interest or problem, and breadth of experience in the formal, technical, and expressive aspects of the student’s art.  Students enrolling should have a serious interest in pursuing, creating, and critiquing their artwork, they should be self-motivated and should understand the difficulty of producing a portfolios that reflects Quality, Concentration, and Breadth in one short year.  

Counseling Notes: A teacher recommendation form must be completed by the current teacher to enroll in this course. There will also be a mandatory student meeting in April that will cover class expectations, and will include work to begin over the summer. At that time the student will sign an AP contract.

Course fee of $87.00 for the A.P. Examination

All students taking AP Studio Art will be required to attempt the Advanced Placement Examination (Portfolio submission).

Digital Arts Classes

PHOTOGRAPHY I, II, III, IV (S,T,E,M)

10, 11, 12 Credit: ½ (CDHE-Academic Elective)

Photography courses expose students to the materials, processes, and artistic techniques of taking artistic photographs. Students learn about the operation of a camera, composition, lighting techniques, depth of field, filters, camera angles, and film development. The course may cover black-and-white photography, color photography, or both. As students advance, the instruction regarding the creative process becomes more refined, and students are encouraged to develop their own artistic style. These courses may also cover major photographers, art movements, and styles.

At Northglenn High School, the Photography classes focus on digital photography techniques. We’ll work with a range of assignments from personal explorations of elements of photography to completing jobs for actual clients. Students will work to create work that is a service to others as well as at attempt to challenge their own creativity and skills.

S - While studying the history of photography, students will learn the basics of the photo-chemical and the digital process. Students also experiment with and explore the properties of light in relation to their eyes, the environment and their equipment.
T - Students use digital media to communicate and work collaboratively. Students are able to customize their learning with digital means as well to gather, evaluate and use information that is particular to their interests. Students will be challenged to use technology in creative ways, innovating their own uses and combinations of tools to fit their purposes.
E - The creative process and Studio Habits that students develop parallel the Engineering Design Process explored in the PLTW classes - students Inquire, Define, Generate Solutions, Evaluate their work, Test solutions, Modify their goals and methods and Communicate their final work.
M - Students will develop tools for and a sense of measurement, exposure calculation, and understanding proportions in relation to lens choice.

Photography 1 - Counseling Notes:

  • Students need a basic digital camera which may include the camera on most advanced smartphones.
  • A materials fee for all students is required. The fee is currently $30.00 and covers basic materials and equipment. If a student chooses to work with more expensive materials than those provided, the student must provide these materials.
  • This course may be used for Fine Arts or Elective credit.

Photography II-IV- Prerequisite: Successful completion of Photography I

Counseling Notes:

  • Students need a basic digital camera which may include the camera on most advanced smartphones.
  • A materials fee for all students is required. The fee is currently $30.00 and covers basic materials and equipment. If a student chooses to work with more expensive materials than those provided, the student must provide these materials.

GRAPHIC ART (S,T,E,M)

10, 11, 12 Credit: ½ (CDHE-Academic Elective)

Creative Art—Comprehensive courses provide students with the knowledge and opportunity to explore an art form and to create individual works of art. These courses may also provide a discussion and exploration of career opportunities in the art world. Initial courses cover the language, materials, and processes of a particular art form and the design elements and principles supporting a work of art. As students advance and become more adept, the instruction regarding the creative process becomes more refined, and students are encouraged to develop their own artistic styles. Although Creative Art courses focus on creation, they may also include the study of major artists, art movements, and styles.

Printmaking/Graphics courses cover the same topics as Creative Art—Comprehensive courses, but focus on design principles, printmaking, and graphic design. At Northglenn High School, the Graphic Art class focuses on digital design techniques. We’ll work with a range of assignments from personal explorations of elements of design to completing jobs for actual clients. Students will work to create work that is a service to others as well as at attempt to challenge their own creativity and skills.

S - Students will also experiment with and explore the properties of color in relation to their eyes, the environment and their equipment.
T - Students use digital media to communicate and work collaboratively. Students are able to customize their learning with digital means as well to gather, evaluate and use information that is particular to their interests. Students will be challenged to use technology in creative ways, innovating their own uses and combinations of tools to fit their purposes.
E - The creative process and Studio Habits that students develop parallel the Engineering Design Process explored in the PLTW classes - students Inquire, Define, Generate Solutions, Evaluate their work, Test solutions, Modify their goals and methods and Communicate their final work.
M - Students will develop tools for and a sense of measurement, exposure calculation, and understanding proportions in relation to lens choice.

Prerequisite: Drawing and Painting I or Photography I.

Counseling Notes:

  1. A materials fee for all students is required. The fee is currently $30.00 and covers basic materials and equipment.

Special Art Programs

POSITIVE ART

9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 (Elective)

Positive Art classes will give students the opportunity to work on art activities with a peer aide under the supervision of the teacher. Art activities will include crafts, drawing, and painting.

Counseling Notes:

  1. This course may be taken for Fine Arts or Elective credit.
  2. Student must have a current IEP to enroll.

POSITIVE ARTIST PEER TUTOR

10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 (Elective)

Experience the joy of helping others in art! Work one-on-one with special needs students to help them discover their talents in crafts, drawing, and painting.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of an art course recommended

PERFORMING ARTS CLASSES (VOCAL, MUSIC, CHORAL)

Vocal Music Instrumental Drama
Choral Ensembles Concert Choir Men’s Choir Advanced Women’s Choir (Lady Norse Singers) * Audition required Chamber Choir * Audition required   Vocal Jazz Ensembles Vocal Show Group (Essence) Vocal Jazz I (Northern Lights) Intro to Instrumental Music Concert Band Jazz Band I, II Symphonic Band (includes Marching Band)* Audition required Color Guard (1st semester only)   Symphonic Orchestra Concert Orchestra Drama Classes Drama I, II, III Theater Dance Theater I, II, III (Application required) Tech Theatre Media Concepts/Video Productions (New class!)

Music classes with performance groups may require additional fees.

CONCERT CHOIR (T,M)

9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 (CDHE-Academic Elective)

Chorus courses provide the opportunity to sing a variety of choral literature styles for men’s and/or women’s voices and are designed to develop vocal techniques and the ability to sing parts. This choir is designed for students who enjoy singing choral music and who are new to vocal music. Performances will include participation in concerts, festivals and/or music clinics. The choir is designed for students (men and women) who want to improve and develop good vocal skills. Class activities include rehearsal techniques, vocal production, music reading, rhythm reading and evaluation of skills development. Students apply the real number system to rhythm, as well as develop skills in fractions. Students apply digital media to gather, evaluate, and use information to develop their singing ability and learn from others examples. Class is open to all interested students.

Prerequisite: Class is open to all interested students. See instructor for voice placement. Audition not required.

Counseling Notes:

1. Students are advised that this group will require extra time for rehearsals and performances (minimum 1 performance per quarter). 2. The course may be repeated for elective credit.

MEN’S CHOIR

9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 (CDHE-Academic Elective)

This is a performance class designed for students who enjoy singing a variety of men’s choir literature. Music performed will be festival literature as well as traditional and popular men’s choir music. Performances will include participation in concerts, festivals, and music clinics. Class activities will focus on the study of a variety of choral literature and vocal production techniques.

Prerequisite: Class is open to all interested students. See instructor for voice placement. Audition not required.

Counseling Notes:

  1. Students are advised that this group will require extra time for rehearsals and performances (minimum 1 performance per quarter).
  2. The course may be repeated for elective credit.

ADVANCED WOMEN’S CHOIR (T,M)

10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 (CDHE-Academic Elective)

Chorus courses provide the opportunity to sing a variety of choral literature styles for men’s and/or women’s voices and are designed to develop vocal techniques and the ability to sing parts. This is a performance class designed for students who enjoy singing a variety of advanced Women’s Choir literature. Music performed will be festival literature as well as traditional and popular women’s vocal music. The class is designed for advanced singers and placement in this ensemble is by audition only. Performances will include participation in concerts, festivals, and/or music clinics. Class activities will focus on the study of a variety of choral literature and vocal production techniques. Students apply the real number system to rhythm, as well as develop skills in fractions. Students apply digital media to gather, evaluate, and use information to develop their singing ability and learn from others examples.

Prerequisite: Audition by instructor.

Counseling Notes:

  1. Students must make allowance for frequent performances in their extra-curricular and work schedules (minimum 1 per quarter). Extra rehearsals in preparation for performances may also be required.
  2. This course may be repeated for elective credit.
  3. Under special circumstances, freshmen may be admitted to Advanced Women’s Choir following an audition by the instructor.

CHAMBER CHOIR (T,E,M)

11, 12 Credit: 1 (CDHE-Academic Elective)

Chorus courses provide the opportunity to sing a variety of choral literature styles for men’s and/or women’s voices and are designed to develop vocal techniques and the ability to sing parts. This choir is an advanced mixed (men and women) vocal ensemble that sings choral literature in a wide variety of musical styles. The class is designed for advanced singers, and placement in this ensemble is by audition only. Students will develop a high level of proficiency in the performance of choral music, including music reading, vocal production, and music history. This choir is one of the major performing ensembles of the school and participates in a number of concerts each year, including festivals, music clinics, honor choir, and/or community outreach. Students apply the real number system to rhythm, as well as develop skills in fractions. Students apply digital media to gather, evaluate, and use information to develop their singing ability and learn from others examples.

Prerequisite: Audition by instructor.

Counseling Notes:

  1. Students must make allowances for frequent performances in their extra-curricular and work schedules (minimum 1 performance per quarter). Extra rehearsals in preparation for performances may also be required.
  2. This course may be repeated for elective credit.
  3. Under special circumstances sophomores may be admitted to Chamber Choir following an audition by the instructor.

VOCAL JAZZ ENSEMBLES

VOCAL SHOW GROUP

11, 12 Credit: 1 (CDHE-Academic Elective)

This is a small select ensemble that performs a broad variety of music including modern jazz and contemporary music. This course is designed for students who are capable of singing more difficult and challenging music, frequently with one singer per voice part. Emphasis will be placed on the development of close harmonic singing techniques, solo singing, part independence, microphone technique, and sight reading skills. Class activities will focus on preparation for performances and the development of individual musicianship. This group participates in a number of concerts each year, including festivals, music clinics, school performances, community concerts, and a wide variety of holiday performances.

Prerequisite: Audition by the instructor in spring preceding enrollment.

Counseling Notes:

  1. Students enrolled in this class should be concurrently enrolled in Chamber Choir to attain basic musical skills (unless waived by the instructor and/or administrator due to scheduling conflicts).
  2. Students must make allowances for frequent performances in their extra-curricular and work schedules (minimum 1 performance per quarter). Extra rehearsals in preparation for performances may also be required.
  3. This course may be repeated for elective credit.
  4. Under special circumstances, sophomores may be admitted to the vocal show group following an audition by the instructor.

VOCAL JAZZ I

11, 12 Credit: 1 (CDHE-Academic Elective)

Vocal Jazz Ensemble (“Northern Lights”) is a group composed of 14 to 20 voices that specializes in the performance of modern jazz and pop-style music. This course is designed for students who are capable of singing more difficult and challenging music. Emphasis will be placed on the development of close harmonic singing techniques, solo singing, improvised solo performance, jazz-style phrasing, microphone technique, and reading skills. Class activities will focus on preparation for performances and the development of individual musicianship. Northern Lights is one of the major performing ensembles of the school and participates in a number of concerts each year, including festivals, music clinics, school concerts, community concerts, and a wide variety of holiday performances.

Prerequisite: Audition by instructor in spring preceding enrollment.

Counseling Notes:

  1. Students enrolled in this class should be concurrently enrolled in Chamber Choir to attain basic musical skills (unless waived by the instructor and/or administrator due to scheduling conflicts).
  2. Students must make allowances for frequent performances in their extra-curricular and work schedules (minimum 1 performance per quarter). Extra rehearsals in preparation for performances may also be required.
  3. This course may be repeated for elective credit.
  4. Under special circumstances, sophomores may be admitted to Vocal Jazz I following an audition by the instructor.

INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC COURSES

Music classes with performance groups may require additional fees.

INTRO to INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC (T, M)

9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 (CDHE-Academic Elective)

Instrumental Ensemble courses are intended to develop students’ technique for playing brass, woodwind, percussion, and/or string instruments in small ensemble groups. Instrumental Ensemble courses cover one or more instrumental ensemble or band literature styles. Daily Practices may include an introduction to music theory, through exploring structure though musical expression, recording, Smart Music and self-guided practice.

  1. Students at this level should have their own instruments. A few school instruments are available, particularly in the lower strings, for qualified students.
  2. Students must make allowance for performances in their extra-curricular and work schedules. Extra rehearsals, in preparation for performances, may also be required .Rehearsals and performances will need flexible time outside of normal class time.
  3. The course may be repeated for elective credit.

CONCERT BAND (T,M)

9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 (CDHE-Academic Elective)

Courses in Concert Band are designed to promote students’ technique for playing brass, woodwind, and percussion instruments and cover a variety of band literature styles, primarily for concert performances. Symphonic band is an audition only course geared toward the advanced musician. Daily practices may include an introduction to music theory, through exploring structure through musical expression, music writing software, recording, Smart Music and self-guided practice. Students enrolled in Concert Band are strongly encouraged to participate in Marching Band unless there are extenuating circumstances that will not allow it. In addition, Concert band students are required to perform at all concert events, festivals, clinics and contests.

Prerequisites:  None

Counseling Notes:

  1. Practice sessions and performances will demand time outside of normal class time.
  2. Students generally are required to own their instruments.
  3. A materials fee may be assessed.
  4. The course may be repeated for elective credit if course grade is “C” or lower. Symphonic Band is recommended for students desiring additional band course work upon completion of Concert Band with course grade of “B” or higher.

SYMPHONIC BAND (T,E,M)

9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 (CDHE-Academic Elective)

Courses in Concert Band are designed to promote students’ technique for playing brass, woodwind, and percussion instruments and cover a variety of band literature styles, primarily for concert performances. Symphonic band is an audition only course geared toward the advanced musician. Daily practices may include writing, advanced music theory and analysis exploring structure through musical expression, music writing software, recording, Smart Music and self-guided practice. Students enrolled in Symphonic Band are required to participate in Marching Band unless there are extenuating circumstances that will not allow it. Symphonic band students will complete a yearly PBL project determined by the director to be presented to a professional panel. In addition, Symphonic band students are required to perform at all concert events, festivals, clinics and contests.

Prerequisites:

  1. Previous playing experience.
  2. Instructor audition.

Counseling Notes:

  1. Students must make allowance for frequent performances in their extra-curricular and work schedules. Extra rehearsals, in preparation for performances, may also be required.
  2. This course also includes pep band performances (second and third quarters).
  3. The course may be repeated for elective credit.
  4. A materials fee of $50.00 will be assessed.
  5. Marching Band requires participation in summer practices, two evenings a week and most Saturdays in the fall.

JAZZ BAND I (T,E,M)

10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 (CDHE-Academic Elective)

Contemporary Band courses help students develop their techniques for playing brass, woodwind, percussion, and string instruments, as well as guitars and keyboards, focusing primarily on contemporary stage band literature styles, such as traditional jazz, jazz improvisation, and rock. Jazz Band I is an audition only course that includes advanced jazz theory, technique, exploring structure through musical expression, language and history. Students will use a variety of technology to create arrangements, tuning exercises, transcribe solos, presentations and recordings. Jazz band students may complete a yearly PBL project determined by the director to be presented to a professional panel. In addition, jazz band students are required to perform at all concert events, festivals, clinics and contests.

Prerequisites:

  1. Audition by instructor.
  2. Student is concurrently registered for Symphonic Band. Symphonic Band is optional for electric guitar, piano, electric bass or other circumstances upon instructor approval.

Counseling Notes:

  1. Students enrolled in this course should be concurrently enrolled in one of the instrumental or vocal groups to attain basic skill building in music (unless waived by the instructor and/or administrator due to scheduling conflicts).
  2. Students generally are required to own their own instrument.
  3. Practice sessions and performances will demand time outside of normal class time.
  4. The course may be repeated for elective credit.
  5. Jazz is the CP equivalent for band in a musical context. Any student who signs up for Jazz I or Jazz II must be cleared through instructor consent.

JAZZ BAND II (T,E,M)

9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 (CDHE-Academic Elective)

Contemporary Band courses help students develop their techniques for playing brass, woodwind, percussion, and string instruments, as well as guitars and keyboards, focusing primarily on contemporary stage band literature styles, such as traditional jazz, jazz improvisation, and rock. Jazz Band II includes an introduction to fundamental jazz theory, exploring structure through musical expression, technique, language and history. Students will use a variety of technology to create arrangements, tuning exercises, presentations and recordings. In addition, jazz band students are required to perform at all concert events, festivals, clinics and contests.

Prerequisites:

1. Student is concurrently registered for Symphonic Band. Symphonic Band is optional for electric guitar, piano, electric bass or other circumstances upon instructor approval. 2. Audition by instructor. 3. Piano, drums, electric guitar, and electric bass must demonstrate competent ability to read traditional music notation at the high school level. For example, tablature diagrams for guitars or piano are not used in this course to present course content.   Counseling Notes: 1. Students enrolled in this course should be concurrently enrolled in one of the instrumental or vocal groups to attain basic skill building in music (unless waived by the instructor and/or administrator due to scheduling conflicts). 2. Students generally are required to own their own equipment. 3. Practice sessions and performances will demand time outside of normal class time. 4. The course may be repeated for elective credit. 5. Jazz is the CP equivalent for band in a musical context. Any student who signs up for Jazz I or II must be through instructor consent.

COLOR GUARD

9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: ½ (CDHE-Academic Elective)

Color guard is one section of the marching band, enhancing the field show using body movement, dance, and colorful equipment such as flags, balls and other props, and traditional guard “weapons” like rifles and sabers. Color guard students must audition and will be selected by the instructor. This group has been recognized for competitive and performance excellence on the local, state and national level. They perform at home football games, field competitions, local parades and other public performance opportunities, and will travel if there is a marching band trip scheduled this year.

Prerequisites:  None

Counseling Notes:

  1. Practice sessions and performances will demand time outside of normal class time.
  2. The student’s grade will be based on classroom criteria, technique, rehearsals, and performances outside the normal class time.
  3. The course may be repeated for elective credit.
  4. A materials fee of $25.00 will be assessed.
  5. Requires participation in summer practices, two evenings a week and most Saturdays in the fall.

SYMPHONIC ORCHESTRA (T,E,M)

9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 (CDHE-Academic Elective)

Orchestra courses are designed to develop students’ abilities to play string instruments, covering a variety of string and orchestral literature styles. Symphonic Orchestra emphasizes intermediate to advanced development of techniques learned in Concert Orchestra. Symphonic Orchestra also teaches students to actively interpret musical phrasing, dynamics and advanced bowing styles, exploring structure through musical expression,while also providing historical context of the pieces being performed. Students also learn advanced high school theory, and are expected to complete a PBL focusing on a topic of the teacher’s choosing, which is either orchestra or musically related.

Prerequisite: Audition by instructor in February.

Counseling Notes:

  1. Students at this level should have their own instruments. A few school instruments are available, particularly in the lower strings, for qualified students.
  2. Students must make allowance for frequent performances in their extra-curricular and work schedules. Extra rehearsals, in preparation for performances, may also be required. Rehearsals and performances will need flexible time outside of normal class time.
  3. This course may be repeated for elective credit.

CONCERT ORCHESTRA (T,E,M)

9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 (CDHE-Academic Elective)

Orchestra courses are designed to develop students’ abilities to play string instruments, covering a variety of string and orchestral literature styles. This course emphasizes review of techniques learned in prior courses as well as teaching new playing and analytical techniques, developing the student’s musical knowledge both on their instrument as well as through musical interpretation. Students learn the following topics: beginning and intermediate bowing styles, shifting, vibrato, major and minor scales, beginning music theory, exploring structure through musical expression, and critical appreciation of various genres of music. Students will also work on a PBL focusing on a topic of the teacher’s choosing, which is either orchestra or musically related.

Prerequisite: Prior string experience or permission of instructor.

Counseling Notes:

  1. Students at this level should have their own instruments. A few school instruments are available, particularly in the lower strings, for qualified students.
  2. Students must make allowance for performances in their extra-curricular and work schedules. Extra rehearsals, in preparation for performances, may also be required .Rehearsals and performances will need flexible time outside of normal class time.
  3. The course may be repeated for elective credit.

DRAMA

While some Drama classes count for English credits, it is recommended that students take CDHE approved English classes to provide their primary credit.

THEATRE DANCE

9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: ½ (CDHE – Academic Elective)

This course explores the dance forms of musical theatre production. Students will have exposure to folk, ballet, Charleston, and musical theatre forms of dance as they are used in stage production. After daily stretching and warm-up exercises, students will learn and practice steps and choreographed dances from various historical periods and productions. Students will view films of dance performances and musicals that include the various dance forms that they are studying. Students may also have the opportunity to choreograph and perform their own short dance pieces.

Counseling Notes:

  1. May be taken for Fine Arts or Elective credit.

DRAMA I (T)

9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: ½ (English, CDHE – Academic Elective)

Introduction to the Theater courses provide an overview of the art, conventions, and history of the theater. Although the courses sometimes include experiential exercises, they emphasize learning about the theater rather than performance. Students learn about one or more of the following topics: basic techniques in acting, major developments in dramatic literature, major playwrights, the formation of theater as a cultural tradition, and critical appreciation of the art. Drama I provides an introduction to acting and technical theatre.

Counseling Notes:

  1. This course is a prerequisite for Drama II.
  2. Credit will be awarded as needed by each individual student in this sequential order: Fine/Practical Arts, English, or Elective.
  3. This class counts as a CORE class.
  4. This class does not qualify as CDHE approved English credit.

DRAMA II (T,E,M)

9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: ½ (English, CDHE – Academic Elective)

Offered Spring Semester Only

Introduction to the Theater courses provide an overview of the art, conventions, and history of the theater. Although the courses sometimes include experiential exercises, they emphasize learning about the theater rather than performance. Students learn about one or more of the following topics: basic techniques in acting, major developments in dramatic literature, major playwrights, the formation of theater as a cultural tradition, and critical appreciation of the art. Drama II focuses on improvisation, scene study and introduces scenic design elements through geometric measurement and dimension.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Drama I.

Counseling Note:

  1. This class also counts as a CORE class.
  2. Credit will be awarded as needed by each individual student in this sequential order: Fine/Practical Arts, English, or Elective.
  3. This class does not qualify as CDHE approved English credit.

DRAMA III (T,E)

11, 12 Credit: 1 (English, CDHE – Academic Elective)

Comprehensive courses are intended to help develop students experience and skill in one or more aspects of theatrical production. Initial courses are usually introductory in nature, providing an overview of the features of drama such as acting, set design, stage management, and so on. The more advanced courses concentrate on improving technique, expanding students’ exposure to different types of theatrical techniques and traditions, and increasing their chances of participating in public productions. These courses may also provide a discussion of career opportunities in the theatre. This course begins with a PBL where students are expected to prepare for a professional audition that is presented to a panel. The course will also focus on the history of Theatre, and play analysis, where students use technology for research, writing and presentation. The course also focuses on advanced acting styles from Greek to Stanislavski. Finally, students technically mount and perform a Shakespeare play in this course.

Prerequisite:

1. Successful completion of Drama II OR 2. Teacher approval.

Counseling Note:

  1. This class also counts as a CORE class.
  2. This class does not qualify as CDHE approved English credit

THEATRE I (This is the 1st semester option) and II (This is the 2nd semester option) (S,T,E,M)

10, 11, 12

Credit: ½ (CDHE – Academic Elective,)

Offered both semesters for acting students.

½ credit for one semester, option of taking yearlong for 1 credit

Comprehensive courses are intended to help develop students experience and skill in one or more aspects of theatrical production. Initial courses are usually introductory in nature, providing an overview of the features of drama such as acting, set design, stage management, and so on. The more advanced courses concentrate on improving technique, expanding students’ exposure to different types of theatrical techniques and traditions, and increasing their chances of participating in public productions. These courses may also provide a discussion of career opportunities in the theatre. Theatre I is a course open to acting students who have successfully completed Drama I and Drama II and wish to continue with their acting skills, providing them a venue to workshop and perform monologues, improvisations and scenes. Acting students will be working one-on-one with directing students, who are learning to put their leadership skills into practice. Acting students will then have an opportunity to be trained in various technical aspects of the theatre. They will be trained in construction, lighting, sound, props, and publicity, taking on various roles as they technically mount the one acts. Finally, students will experience a PBL as they explore problems in their society through the form of writing and producing a problem play. They are expected to use technology for research, writing, and presentation.

Prerequisite:

1. Successful completion of Drama I and Drama II for acting students. 2. Instructor approval and application process. 3. This class may be repeated for elective credit.

THEATRE III (S,T,E,M)

12 Credit: 1 (CDHE – Academic Elective)

must be taken by directing students for yearlong credit

This intensive course on the craft of directing, technical design, artistic collaboration, is only for the serious student of the theatre, preparing him or her for leadership in play production. Directing students will choose a one act, prepare for auditions, learn finite directorial skills, and see a one act through to production. Students will also be trained in the technical craft of theatre, taking on leadership roles in set, lighting and sound design, while participating in the technical mounting of their production. Finally, directing students will also participate in a playwriting unit, taking on leadership roles of direction as the original piece prepares for performance.

Prerequisite:

1. Successful completion of Drama III. 2. Instructor approval and application process.

TECH THEATRE

11, 12 Credit: 1 (CDHE – Academic Elective)

This yearlong course will focus on theatrical production through the eyes of designers, and technicians in the production side of theatrical works. Students will discover various theatrical crafts from publicity, to props, to makeup, to lighting, to construction as they create their own designs for various scripted performances. Second semester will focus on design projects of productions at Northglenn High School, where students will work towards their capstone project, most likely where they design a production and produce a theatrical design portfolio.

Prerequisite:

1. Successful completion of Drama I, II, and Theatre I 2. Instructor approval and application process.

Math Courses

Any other path is a special case and must be determined on a case by case basis with teacher and parent approval.

Counseling Notes:

  1. Math course offerings are sequential. Students MUST pass a prerequisite in order to advance to the next math offering.
  2. Math is required for all freshmen, sophomores and juniors.
  3. Four-year colleges (CDHE) require successful completion of MATH 3 or higher. Check with potential colleges to find out their math admittance requirements.
  4. AP classes are weighted at 5.0
  5. Freshmen will take blocked math classes (MATH 1/MATH 2 or MATH 2/MATH 3)
  6. MATH Foundations is available through Special Programs.

INTEGRATED MATHEMATICS 1 (S,M)

9 Credit: 1 (CDHE-Math, NCAA-Math)

Integrated Math courses emphasize the teaching of mathematics as problem solving, communication, and reasoning, and emphasize the connections among mathematical topics and between mathematics and other disciplines. The multi-period sequence of Integrated Math replaces the traditional Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II sequence of courses, and usually covers the following topics during a three- or four-year sequence: algebra, functions, geometry from both a synthetic and an algebraic perspective, trigonometry, statistics and probability, discrete mathematics, the conceptual underpinnings of calculus, and mathematical structure.

MATH 1 begins the integrated development of high school mathematics. Students will develop the ability to recognize and describe important patterns that relate quantitative variables, visual relationships and statistical relationships; to use data tables, graphs, words and symbols to represent these relationships; and to use reasoning and calculating tools to answer questions and solve problems.

Focused units of study include: variables and functions, algebraic expressions and recurrence relations; coordinate graphing, data tables and spread sheets; equations and inequalities. Other topics include distributions of data, dot plots, histograms, and box plots; measures of center and their properties and measures of variability. Linear functions, slope of line, rate of change, data patterns, solving linear equations and inequalities, and equivalent linear expressions are included. The concepts of exponential growth and decay functions, data modeling, growth and decay rates, half-life and doubling time, compound interest, and properties of exponents will be developed. In the math standard of Shape and Geometric Relationships students will cover triangle inequality, congruence conditions, special quadrilaterals, Pythagorean Theorem, properties of polygons, and properties of polyhedral and Platonic solids. The math standard of Patterns, Functions, and Algebraic Relationships continues with quadratic functions and their graphs, applications to projectile motion and economic problems, expanding and factoring quadratic expressions, and solving quadratic equations. The math standard of Statistics and Probability is explored including sample spaces, equally-likely outcomes, probability distributions, mutually exclusive events, Addition Rule, simulation, random digits, discrete and continuous random variable, Law of Large Numbers, and geometric probability.

Counseling Note: Students will need a TI-83 or TI-84 calculator.

INTEGRATED MATHEMATICS 2 (S,T,M)

9, 10

Credit 1 (CDHE-Math, NCAA-Math)

Integrated Math courses emphasize the teaching of mathematics as problem solving, communication, and reasoning, and emphasize the connections among mathematical topics and between mathematics and other disciplines. The multi-period sequence of Integrated Math replaces the traditional Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II sequence of courses, and usually covers the following topics during a three- or four-year sequence: algebra, functions, geometry from both a synthetic and an algebraic perspective, trigonometry, statistics and probability, discrete mathematics, the conceptual underpinnings of calculus, and mathematical structure.

MATH 2 continues by reviewing and extending students abilities to recognize, describe, and use functional relationships among quantitative variables, with an emphasis on relationships that involve two or more independent variables. Students will also work on strengthening their understanding of coordinate methods for representing and analyzing properties of geometric shapes and describing geometric change. In the unit of regression and correlation students will work on understanding the characteristics and interpretation of the least square regression equations and the use of correlation to measure the strength of linear association between two variables. Within the standard of Patterns, Functions, and Algebraic Methods students will be introduced to function notation, constructing and reasoning with functions that model parabolic shapes and other quadratic relationships with more emphasis on symbolic reasoning methods and introducing common logarithms and algebraic methods for solving exponential equations. Trigonometric methods will develop student understanding of trigonometric functions and the ability to use trigonometric methods to solve triangulation and indirect measurement problems. Final units in Course 2 will increase students’ abilities to understand and visualize situations involving chance by using simulation and mathematical analysis to construct probability distributions.

Prerequisites: Math 1

Counseling Note: Students will need a TI-83 or TI-84 calculator.

INTEGRATED MATHEMATICS 3 (T,M)

10, 11

Credit 1 (CDHE-Math, NCAA-Math)

Integrated Math courses emphasize the teaching of mathematics as problem solving, communication, and reasoning, and emphasize the connections among mathematical topics and between mathematics and other disciplines. The multi-period sequence of Integrated Math replaces the traditional Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II sequence of courses, and usually covers the following topics during a three- or four-year sequence: algebra, functions, geometry from both a synthetic and an algebraic perspective, trigonometry, statistics and probability, discrete mathematics, the conceptual underpinnings of calculus, and mathematical structure.

MATH 3 continues the integrated development of high school mathematics along the interwoven strands of algebra, functions, geometry, trigonometry, statistics and probability. Focused units of study connect these strands through an emphasis on reasoning and proof in geometric, algebraic, and statistical contexts and of basic principles that underlie those reasoning strategies. Inequalities and linear programming will extend students’ ability to reason both algebraically and graphically with topics that include inequalities in one and two variables including absolute value and quadratic inequalities. Students will extend their understanding to similarity and congruence and use those relations to solve problems and to prove geometric assertions with and without the use of coordinates. Students will work on developing an understanding of the measurement of variability including normal distribution, standardized scores and binomial distributions. Polynomial and rational functions will extend students’ abilities to represent and draw inferences using symbolic expressions and manipulations. The last units of study for this course will focus upon circles and circular functions, recursion and iteration, and finally inverse functions with a focus on logarithmic functions and their use in modeling and analyzing problem situations and data patterns.

Prerequisites: MATH 2

Counseling Note: Students will need a TI-83 or TI-84 calculator.

MATH ANALYSIS (S,M)

11, 12 Credit: 0.5 (CDHE-Math, NCAA-Math)

Math Analysis courses include the study of polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and rational functions and their graphs; vectors; set theory; Boolean algebra and symbolic logic; mathematical induction; matrix algebra; sequences and series; and limits and continuity. They may also include some study of trigonometry and/or pre-calculus topics. Elementary Functions courses, while preparing students for eventual work in calculus, include the study of relations and functions, including polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, rational, right trigonometric, and circular functions, and their inverses, graphs, and applications.

Counseling Notes:

  1. This course is highly recommended for any student who is interested in non-science/math based careers.
  2. Students should have average to above average grades in all previous math courses.
  3. A graphing calculator is required (TI-84 is recommended).

TRIGONOMETRY (M)

11, 12 Credit: 0.5 (CDHE-Math, NCAA-Math)

Trigonometry courses prepare students for eventual work in calculus and typically include the following topics: trigonometric and circular functions; their inverses and graphs; relations among the parts of a triangle; trigonometric identities and equations; solutions of right and oblique triangles; and complex numbers.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of MATH 3.

Counseling Notes:

  1. This course is highly recommended for any student who is interested in non-science/math based careers.
  2. Students should have average to above average grades in all previous math courses.
  3. A graphing calculator is required (TI-84 is recommended).

INTEGRATED MATHEMATICS 4 (S,T,M)

10, 11, 12

Credit 1 (CDHE-Math, NCAA-Math)

Integrated Math courses emphasize the teaching of mathematics as problem solving, communication, and reasoning, and emphasize the connections among mathematical topics and between mathematics and other disciplines. The multi-period sequence of Integrated Math replaces the traditional Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II sequence of courses, and usually covers the following topics during a three- or four-year sequence: algebra, functions, geometry from both a synthetic and an algebraic perspective, trigonometry, statistics and probability, discrete mathematics, the conceptual underpinnings of calculus, and mathematical structure.

Prerequisites:

At least one of the following:

  • “A” or “B” in MATH 3
  • Successful completion of Math Analysis and Trigonometry

Counseling Notes: Students will need a T1-83 or T1-84 calculator. This class is the pre-requisite for AP Calculus.

DISCRETE: MANAGEMENT SCIENCE & SOCIAL CHOICE (S,T,M)

11, 12

Credit: 0.5 (CDHE-Math, NCAA-Math)

Discrete Mathematics courses include the study of topics such as number theory, discrete probability, set theory, symbolic logic, Boolean algebra, combinatorics, recursion, basic algebraic structures and graph theory.

This one semester class will include such topics as graph theory, and mathematical applications to social/environmental issues. Preparation for ACT and College Math Placement Test. Extensive group work, short and long term written and oral projects will be required along with daily assignments. Preparation for ACT and College Math Placement Test is also included.

Prerequisites: Successful Completion of MATH 3

Counseling Notes:

  1. This course is specifically designed for college-bound students whose career goals are non-technical in nature and do not require a strong math/science background.
  2. This course meets college entrance requirements. However students planning to major in engineering must complete MATH 4.

DISCRETE: CODING & SCALING (T,M)

11, 12 Credit: 0.5 (CDHE-Math, NCAA-Math)

Discrete Mathematics courses include the study of topics such as number theory, discrete probability, set theory, symbolic logic, Boolean algebra, combinatorics, recursion, basic algebraic structures and graph theory.

This one semester class will include such topics as coding methods and patterns in geometry. Preparation for ACT and College Math Placement Test also included. Extensive group work, short and long term written and oral projects will be required along with daily assignments. Preparation for ACT and College Math Placement Test is also included.

Prerequisites: Successful Completion of MATH 3

Counseling Notes:

  1. This course is specifically designed for college-bound students whose career goals are non-technical in nature and do not require a strong math/science background.
  2. This course meets college entrance requirements. However students planning to major in engineering must complete MATH 4.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT STATISTICS (S,T,E,M)

11, 12 Credit: 1 (CDHE-Math, NCAA-Math) (Weighted 5.0)

Following the College Board's suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level statistics courses, AP Statistics courses introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: exploring data, sampling and experimentation, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference.

Prerequisites:

At least one of the following:

  • “A” or “B” in MATH 3
  • Successful completion of MATH 4
  • Successful completion of Discrete Math.

Counseling Notes:

  1. Students may not go from AP Statistics into AP Calculus without taking Math Anal/Trig or MATH 4
  2. Students are required to have a TI-83, TI-84 or TI-89 graphing calculator.
  3. Northglenn High School requires all advanced placement students to take the AP exam. The current fee for each AP exam is $94.00, but is subject to change based on the College Board. Financial aid is available for students who need assistance.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS (AB) (S,T,E,M)

11, 12 Credit: 1 (CDHE-Math, NCAA-Math)

(Weighted 5.0)

Following the College Board's suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level calculus courses, AP Calculus AB provides students with an intuitive understanding of the concepts of calculus and experience with its methods and applications. These courses introduce calculus and include the following topics: elementary functions; properties of functions and their graphs; limits and continuity; differential calculus (including definition of the derivative, derivative formulas, theorems about derivatives, geometric applications, optimization problems, and rate-of-change problems); and integral calculus (including ant derivatives and the definite integral).

This class is equivalent to a first year college calculus and analytic geometry course. Students will be prepared to take the Advanced Placement Examination in Mathematics given each spring. Activities involve in-class oral and written work and extensive work outside the class.

Prerequisite: A or B in Math Analysis/Trig or MATH 4 and the instructor’s recommendation.

Counseling Notes:

  1. Performance in all previous math classes and the recommendations of the teachers of those classes will determine eligibility.
  2. Northglenn High School requires all advanced placement students to take the AP exam. The current fee for each AP exam is $94.00, but is subject to change based on the College Board. Financial aid is available for students who need assistance.
  3. Students may be able to earn credit through the CU Succeed Gold Program.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS (BC) (S,T,E,M)

11, 12 Credit: 2 (CDHE-Math, NCAA-Math)

(Weighted 5.0)

Following the College Board's suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level calculus courses, AP Calculus BC courses provide students with an intuitive understanding of the concepts of calculus and experience with its methods and applications, and also require additional knowledge of the theoretical tools of calculus. These courses assume a thorough knowledge of elementary functions, and cover all of the calculus topics in AP Calculus AB as well as the following topics: vector functions, parametric equations, and polar coordinates; rigorous definitions of finite and nonexistent limits; derivatives of vector functions and parametrically defined functions; advanced techniques of integration and advanced applications of the definite integral; and sequences and series.

This class is equivalent to a two semester college calculus and analytic geometry course. Activities include oral and written work and extensive work outside the classroom. This course will help students prepare for the required A. P. Calculus AB or BC exam.

Prerequisite: A or B in Math Analysis/Trig or MATH 4 and the instructor’s recommendation.

Counseling Notes:

  1. Performance in all previous math classes and the recommendations of the teachers of those classes will determine eligibility. Northglenn High School requires all advanced placement students to take the AP exam. The current fee for each AP exam is $94.00, but is subject to change based on College Board. Financial aid is available for students who need assistance.

CALCULUS 3 (S,T,E,M)

12 Credit: 1 (CDHE-Math, NCAA-Math)

Calculus courses include the study of derivatives, differentiation, integration, the definite and indefinite integral, and applications of calculus. Typically, students have previously attained knowledge of pre-calculus topics (some combination of trigonometry, elementary functions, analytic geometry, and math analysis). Multivariate Calculus courses include the study of hyperbolic functions, improper integrals, directional directives, and multiple integration and its applications. Differential Calculus courses include the study of elementary differential equations including first- and higher-order differential equations, partial differential equations, linear equations, systems of linear equations, transformations, series solutions, numerical methods, boundary value problems, and existence theorems.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of AP Calculus BC.

Counseling Notes:

  1. Students may be able to earn credit through the CU Succeed Gold Program.


PHYSICAL EDUCATION COURSES AVAILABLE

Four semesters of physical education are required to graduate at the senior high level. Three semesters of these courses should be selected from physical education activity classes and one semester of Healthy Choices. Health is required to be taken at the ninth grade level, as well as one semester of Introduction to Fitness. The other two semesters may be taken any semester during tenth, eleventh, or twelfth grade.

The senior high physical education curriculum is designed to provide students with the opportunity to select co-educational activities that emphasize the development of skill proficiency in lifetime sports and offers carry-over value for adult life. This curriculum provides the student with situations that encourage and stress the development of desirable social attitudes along with both mental and physical fitness.

9th Grade 10th Grade 11th Grade 12th Grade
Healthy Choices Intro to Fitness Healthy Choices Intro to Fitness Athletic Performance Lifetime Fitness Racket Sports Soccer/Floor Hockey Strength & Conditioning Team Sports I Team Sports II Weight Training I Weight Training II Athletic Performance Athletic Training Lifetime Fitness Positive P.E. Racket Sports Soccer/Floor Hockey Strength & Conditioning Team Sports I Team Sports II Weight Training I Weight Training II Athletic Performance Athletic Training Bowling Lifetime Fitness Positive P.E. Racket Sports Soccer/Floor Hockey Strength & Conditioning Team Sports Weight Training I Weight Training II

PHYSICAL EDUCATION CONTENT STANDARDS

  1. Movement Competence and Understanding
  2. Physical & Personal Wellness
  3. Emotional & Social Wellness
  4. Prevention and Risk Management

HEALTH CONTENT STANDARDS

  1. Students will comprehend concepts related to health promotion and disease prevention.
  2. Students will demonstrate the ability to access valid health information and health promoting products and services.
  3. Students will demonstrate the ability to practice health-enhancing behaviors and reduce health risks.
  4. Students will analyze the influence of culture, media, technology and other factors on health.
  5. Students will demonstrate the ability to use interpersonal communication skills to enhance health.
  6. Students will demonstrate the ability to use goal-setting and decision-making skills to enhance health.
  7. Students will demonstrate the ability to advocate for personal, family, and community health.

HEALTHY CHOICES (S,T,E)

9 *Required Credit: ½ (CDHE-Academic Elective)

Healthy Choices is a required ninth grade health class that is designed to promote healthy lifestyle choices. Topics covered within Health Education courses may vary widely, but typically include personal health (nutrition, mental health and stress management, drug/alcohol abuse prevention, disease prevention, and first aid) and consumer health issues. The courses may also include brief studies of environmental health, personal development, and/or community resources.

INTRODUCTION TO FITNESS (S,T,E)

9, 10 *Required Credit ½

This course is open to any ninth or tenth grade student. Successful completion of this course is needed prior to taking any other physical education course. At the conclusion of this course, students will have participated in a variety of activities and will have an understanding of the concepts that relate to health and wellness. Health and Fitness courses combine the topics of Health Education courses (nutrition, stress management, substance abuse prevention, disease prevention, first aid, and so on) with an active fitness component (typically including aerobic activity and fitness circuits) with the intention of conveying the importance of life-long wellness habits.

ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE

10, 11, 12 Credit ½

This semester course is designed for the student athlete who would like to take their training to the next level. Ground Based Power Movements along with advanced weight training concepts will be emphasized. Courses in Specific Sports Activities help students develop knowledge, experience, and skills in a single sport or activity (such as basketball, volleyball, track and field, and equestrian events) other than those coded within this section.

Counselor Notes: Requires instructor approval/Signature.

LIFETIME FITNESS (S)

10, 11, 12 Credit: ½

Lifetime Fitness refers to a system of exercise based on stimulating heart and lung activity for a time period sufficiently long enough to produce beneficial changes in the body. These courses emphasize acquiring knowledge and skills regarding lifetime physical fitness; content may include related topics such as nutrition, stress management, and consumer issues. Students may develop and implement a personal fitness plan.

POSITIVE PHYSICAL EDUCATION

10, 11, 12 Credit: ½

These courses provide physical education activities (sports, fitness, and conditioning) adapted for students with special needs. In this course students will be paired with a peer tutor with supervision of the teacher. Students will be participating in the following activities: Basketball, volleyball, dance, hockey, soccer, flag football, badminton and tennis.

Prerequisite: Must have an IEP to enroll in this course

RACKET SPORTS

10, 11, 12 Credit: ½

Individual/Dual Sports courses provide students with knowledge, experience, and an opportunity to develop skills in more than one individual or dual sport (such as tennis, badminton, pickle ball, table tennis, and so on). Students will learn how participation in racket sports promotes lifelong fitness.

SOCCER/FLOOR HOCKEY

10, 11, 12 Credit: ½

Team Sports courses provide students with knowledge, experience, and an opportunity to develop skills in more than one team sport. This course will include a nine-week unit in floor hockey and soccer, and will focus on the development of skills necessary for successful and enjoyable participation in these activities, as well as care and selection of appropriate equipment. Rules, strategy, safety, game courtesies, and related terminology are introduced and applied to game situations.

STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING

11, 12 Credit: ½

Strength and Conditioning class will provide an opportunity for development of strength and conditioning for various sports and fitness related activities. Students wishing to enroll in this class will need a recommendation from a P.E. Teacher, or their coach, and a parent signature. Free weights, exercise machines and conditioning activities will be incorporated to promote improvement in strength, endurance, balance, agility, and speed. Proper technique, safety precautions and proper application of the Principles of Training will be emphasized. A plan to achieve goals will be developed and implemented during this semester course.

Counselor Notes: Requires instructor approval/Signature.

TEAM SPORTS

10, 11, 12 Credit: ½

Team Sports courses provide students with knowledge, experience, and an opportunity to develop skills in more than one team sport. This course involves 4-5 week units in each of the following activities: basketball, volleyball, softball, and flag football. All units will provide proper instruction of the activities to include technique, fundamental skills, origin, safety practices, values, playing courtesies, strategies, rules and terminology.

WEIGHT TRAINING l

10, 11, 12 Credit: ½

Weight Training courses help students develop knowledge and skills with free weights and universal stations while emphasizing safety and proper body positioning; they may include other components such as anatomy and conditioning. This course is designed for the student with a high interest in muscle development through use of resistive exercise. The course also includes a well-rounded education for specific lifts for each specific body part. Also included is a study of the muscle system, setting up personal workouts, and keeping daily workout charts.

Counselor Notes: This class may be repeated as often as a student would like for elective credit.

WEIGHT TRAINING ll (S)

10, 11, 12 Credit: ½

Weight Training courses help students develop knowledge and skills with free weights and universal stations while emphasizing safety and proper body positioning; they may include other components such as anatomy and conditioning. The semester long course is designed for the experienced weightlifter. In addition to the topics covered in Weight Training I, students will be instructed in program design, adaptations to training, and periodization. Also, Included is a study of anatomical planes and landmarks as well as a more in depth look at muscle structure and function.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Weight Training I

ATHLETIC TRAINING (S,T,E)

11, 12 Credit ½

This course is for students who have an interest in Athletic Training or Allied Health professions. Courses in Sports Physiology examine human anatomy and physiology as they pertain to human movement and physical performance in sports activities. These courses may also emphasize the prevention and treatment of athletic injuries. Student will learn about anatomy, physiology, and injuries that are common in sports. Student will also learn about different training systems and injury prevention.

Prerequisite: Completion of two PE classes not including Healthy Choices, Class Fee: $35.00

POSITIVE PHYSICAL EDUCATION PEER TUTOR

11, 12 Credit: ½ (Elective)

Physical, Health, and Safety Education—Aide courses offer students the opportunity to assist instructors in preparing, organizing, or delivering course curricula. Students may provide tutorial or instructional assistance to other students. This course is designed for students who like to assist students with special needs in learning and experiencing the enjoyment in the following physical activities: basketball, volleyball, dance, hockey, soccer, flag football, badminton and tennis.

Prerequisite: Completion of two PE classes not including Healthy Choices

BOWLING

12 Credit: ½

Recreation Sports courses provide students with knowledge, experience, and an opportunity to develop skills. This course is designed for both beginning and intermediate skilled bowlers. The origin, development, and nature of the game will be introduced along with the techniques and fundamentals of the game. Rules of the game, scoring, and safety practices are examined and expected. Bowling is a fun educational class that will create a learning environment in which students feel comfortable trying new skills in hope of finding a lifetime recreational activity.

Class Fee: $75.00


Science Courses

PHYSICS (S,T,E,M)

9th Grade Credit: 1 (CDHE/NCAA-Science)

The students in this year-long, 9th grade algebra based physics course will explore and apply Newtonian Mechanics including: kinematics, forces, momentum, energy, waves, and circuits. Physics is designed to help students explain and find applications of physical laws. The interrelationships with other sciences will also be developed, particularly the areas of chemistry and astronomy. The course provides many opportunities for students to verify and apply physical laws using experiments. This is an inquiry based course that will be hands on and lab-based.

Counseling Notes:

  • A $10.00 materials fee will be charged.
  • Students will be assigned based on math placement exam.

COLLEGE-PREPARATORY PHYSICS (S,T,E,M)

9th Grade Credit: 1 (CDHE/NCAA-Science)

The students in this year-long, college-prep course will explore and apply physical laws through both lecture and laboratory experiences. This course is intended to prepare students for college level or A.P. Physics. Physics is designed to help students explain and find applications of physical laws. The interrelationships with other sciences will also be developed, particularly the areas of chemistry and astronomy. The course provides many opportunities for students to verify and apply physical laws using experiments.

Counseling Notes:

  • A $10.00 materials fee will be charged.
  • Students will be assigned based on math placement exam.

CHEMISTRY (S,T,E,M)

10th -12th Grade Credit: 1 (CDHE/NCAA-Science)

This year-long course studies matter, its structure, properties and composition, and the changes that matter undergoes. The emphasis in this course is on theory and the mathematical application of chemical concepts through a real-world application. Laboratory work provides a basis for understanding concepts and principles in this course.

Counseling Notes:

  • A $10.00 materials fee will be charged.

College Preparatory CHEMISTRY (S,T,E,M)

10th -12th Grade Credit: 1 (CDHE/NCAA-Science)

This year-long course studies matter, its structure, properties and composition, and the changes that matter undergoes. The emphasis in this course is on theory and the mathematical application of chemical concepts. Laboratory work provides a basis for understanding concepts and principles in this course. This course is intended to prepare students for college level or AP Chemistry.

Counseling Notes:

  • A $10.00 materials fee will be charged.
  • Prerequisites: A or B in previous math or science course and concurrent enrollment in CMIC 2/3 or higher and completion with A or B.

BIOLOGY (S,T,E,M)

10th-12th Grade Credit: 1 (CDHE/NCAA-Science)

This lab-based course investigates evolution, ecology, kingdoms of organisms, cellular and biochemical processes, basic genetics, populations and natural selection. Activities presented emphasize the development of science skills, experimental design, collection and analysis of data, reporting and communicating results, and the use of technology. Laboratory skills will be emphasized and will apply the content via a real-world application. Dissections will be performed..

Counseling Notes:

A $10.00 materials fee will be charged

COLLEGE PREPARATORY BIOLOGY (S,T,E,M)

10th Grade Credit: 1 (CDHE/NCAA-Science)

This lab-based course investigates evolution, ecology, kingdoms of organisms, cellular and biochemical processes, basic genetics, populations and natural selection. Activities presented emphasize the development of science skills, experimental design, collection and analysis of data, reporting and communicating results, and the use of technology. Dissections will be performed. There will be a strong emphasis on reading, writing, and mathematics to develop a more in-depth understanding of the relationships that exist between the biological topics covered. This course will build on concepts from physics and chemistry. This course is designed for students with a high interest in science.

Prerequisites: A or B in previous science course.

Counseling Notes:

  • A $10.00 materials fee will be charged

COLLEGE-PREPARATORY ANATOMY / PHYSIOLOGY (S,T,E,M)

11th and 12th Grade Credit: 1 (CDHE/NCAA-Science)

Students study human anatomy and physiology, reproduction and development. Emphasis will be on accurate terminology, metabolic processes, and homeostasis, the complementary nature of structure and function, and clinical application. Mammalian dissections are required. Coursework will include a variety of teaching methods with several in and out of class projects. This is a year-long course designed for students with either a high interest in biology or who want to pursue careers in medicine, nursing, medical technology, genetics, or health fields. Optional field trip at cost.

Prerequisites: A, B, or C in previous science course.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT BIOLOGY (S,T,E,M)

11th and 12th Grade (10th teacher recommendation) Credit: 1 (CDHE/

NCAA Science) (Weighted 5.0)

AP Biology allows outstanding science students to complete the equivalent of a college-level biology survey course with the possibility of earning college credit while still in high school. All AP students are expected to take the AP exam in May. The core-theme of evolution unites study in the biological fields of biochemistry, cytology, bioenergetics, heredity, molecular genetics, ecology, taxonomy, and anatomy. Due to the lecture format, as well as the depth and scope of these topics, students MUST have good reading, organizational and comprehension skills for success. A standard college text for science majors is used.

As a college level course, AP Biology also includes a laboratory component. Most of the lab activities cannot be completed within the regular class period. Because of this, students will be required to budget additional time before or after school to complete these activities.

Prerequisites: C.P. Chemistry, CP Biology, CP Physics, AP Physics 1, 2, or C. A or B in previous science class.

Counseling Notes:

  1. Northglenn High School requires all advanced placement students to take the AP exam. The current fee for each AP exam is $93.00, but is subject to change based on the College Board. Financial aid is available for students who need assistance.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT CHEMISTRY (S,T,E,M)

11th and 12th Grade Credit: 1 (CDHE/NCAA-Science)

(Weighted 5.0)

This program is the equivalent of a typical first year chemistry lecture and lab course at the college level. It is appropriate for students planning to major in biological or physical sciences, engineering, medical technologies, pre-med studies, or pre-dental studies. Topics include stoichiometry, atomic structure, bonding, molecular structure, thermodynamics, gases, liquids, solutions, equilibria, kinetics, redox, organic chemistry, and nuclear chemistry. The lab component allows students to perform experiments on these topics and gain experience observing, recording and interpreting physical and chemical phenomena. As a college level course, AP Chemistry will require substantial independent study.

Prerequisites: Successful completion with an A or B in C.P Chemistry. Successful completion (A or B in CMIC III or higher math course.)

Counseling Notes:

  1. A $10.00 materials fee will be charged.
  2. Northglenn High School requires all advanced placement students to take the AP exam. The current fee for each AP exam is $93.00, but is subject to change based on the College Board. Financial aid is available for students who need assistance.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (S,T,E,M)

11th and 12th Grade Credit: 1 (CDHE/NCAA-Science)

This one year course will explore the relationship between the environment and the factors that impact it. Students will use a variety of science disciplines including biology, geology, meteorology, and chemistry in order to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, and to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-=made. Students will perform field work in addition to laboratory work to investigate risks and solutions for resolving and/or preventing environmental related problems.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENVIROMENTAL SCIENCE (S,T,E,M)

11th and 12th Grade (10th teacher recommendation)

Credit: 1 (CDHE/NCAA-Science) (Weighted 5.0)

The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them.

Prerequisites: A or B in previous science course.

Counseling Notes:

  1. Northglenn High School requires all advanced placement students to take the A.P exam. The current fee for each A.P exam is $93.00, but is subject to change based on the College Board. Financial aid is available for students who need assistance.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT PHYSICS 1 (S,T,E,M)

9TH Grade Credit: 1 (CDHE/NCAA-Science)

(Weighted 5.0)

This is a college-level, algebra- and trigonometry-based physics course that covers Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work, energy, and power; and mechanical waves and sound. It will also introduce electric circuits.  NOTE:  At the end of this course, students will be expected to take the AP Physics 1 exam.  Enrollment in this course requires submission of application with recommendations from current math and science teachers.  

Prerequisites: Students will be placed based on math entrance exam. Must be enrolled in CMIC 2/3 or higher.

Counseling Notes:

  1. Northglenn High School requires all advanced placement students to take the AP exam. The current fee for each AP exam is $93.00, but is subject to change based on the College Board. Financial aid is available for students who need assistance.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT PHYSICS 2 (S,T,E,M)

10th - 12th Grade Credit: 1 (CDHE/NCAA-Science)

(Weighted 5.0)

This is a college-level, algebra based physics course that covers advanced topics including thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, waves and geometric optics, electricity, magnetism and modern physics.

Prerequisites: Completion or concurrent enrollment in CMIC3 AND A or B in CP Physics or AP Physics C and previous math class.

Counseling Notes:

  1. Northglenn High School requires all advanced placement students to take the AP exam. The current fee for each AP exam is $93.00, but is subject to change based on the College Board. Financial aid is available for students who need assistance.
  2. At the end of this course, students will be expected to take the AP physics 2 exam, and have the option of taking the AP physics 1 exam.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT PHYSICS C (S,T,E,M)

11TH AND 12TH Grade Credit: 1 (CDHE/NCAA-Science)

(Weighted 5.0)

This is a college-level, calculus based physics course that explores Newtonian mechanics during the first semester, followed by electricity and magnetism (E&M) during the second semester.

Prerequisites: Completion or concurrent enrollment in AP Calculus (A/B or B/C) AND completion of previous physics course or instructor approval.

Counseling Notes:

  1. Northglenn High School requires all advanced placement students to take the AP exam. The current fee for each AP exam is $93.00, but is subject to change based on the College Board. Financial aid is available for students who need assistance.
  2. At the end of this course, students will be expected to take the AP physics C Mechanics AND the AP physics C, E&M exams. (The AP exam fee will be paid for each exam).

FORENSIC SCIENCE (S,T,E,M)

11th and 12th Grade Credit: 1 (CDHE/NCAA-Science)

This rigorous year-long course focuses on many scientific and non-scientific disciplines including chemistry, anatomy, genetics, physics, medicine, anthropology, math, sociology, law, and communication. Coursework focuses on case studies, teamwork and cooperative learning to study a variety of topics central to forensic science.

Note: There will be a limited number of section offerings. Seniors will have first priority.

GEOLOGY (S,T,E,M)

11th and 12th Grade Credit: 1 (CDHE/NCAA-Science)

Geology is the study of how and why the earth is constantly changing. Students will be engaged in how people reconstruct and date events in Earth’s planetary history, why the continents move, and what causes earthquakes and volcanoes. Students will also explore the properties and movements of water that shape Earth's surface and affect its systems. Students will investigate biogeology, researching questions related to natural hazards, Earth’s surface processes, human activities and how they interact. This course covers both historical and physical geology, in particular, invertebrate fossils, dinosaurs, plate tectonics, volcanoes, earthquakes, and rocks and minerals. Emphasis will be placed on the geologic history of the western U.S. including dinosaur discoveries, formation of the Rocky Mountains, Yellowstone, and the minerals of Colorado.

STEM (Science Technology Engineering and Math)

Credit: 1 Elective Credit

BIOMEDICAL PATHWAY

The PLTW Biomedical Program is a sequence of courses which follows PLTW Engineering’s proven hands-on, real world problem-solving approach to learning. Students explore the concepts of human medicine and are introducing to bioinformatics, including mapping and analyzing DNA

PLTW: Project Lead the Way Principles of Biomedical Sciences (PBS): (S,T,E,M)

9th-12th Grade

This course provides an introduction to the biomedical sciences through exciting hands-on projects and problems. Students investigate the human body systems and various health conditions including heart disease, diabetes, sickle-cell disease, hypercholesterolemia, and infectious diseases. They determine the factors that led to the death of a fictional person, and investigate lifestyle choices and medical treatments that might have prolonged the person’s life. The activities and projects introduce students to human physiology, medicine, research processes and bioinformatics. Key biological concepts including homeostasis, metabolism, inheritance of traits, and defense against disease are embedded in the curriculum. Engineering principles including the design process, feedback loops, and the relationship of structure to function are also incorporated. This course is designed to provide an overview of all the courses in the Biomedical Sciences program and lay the scientific foundation for subsequent courses.

PLTW: Project Lead the Way Human Body Systems (HBS): (S,T,E,M)

10th-12th Grade

Students examine the interactions of body systems as they explore identity, communication, power, movement, protection, and homeostasis. Students design experiments, investigate the structures and functions of the human body, and use data acquisition software to monitor body functions such as muscle movement, reflex and voluntary action, and respiration. Exploring science in action, students build organs and tissues on a skeletal manikin, work through interesting real world cases and often play the role of biomedical professionals to solve medical mysteries.

PLTW: Project Lead the Way Medical Interventions (MI): (S,T,E,M)

11th-12th Grade

Students investigate a variety of interventions involved in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease as they follow the life of a fictitious family. The course is “How-to” manual for maintaining overall health and homeostasis in the body. Students explore how to prevent and fight infection; screen and evaluate the code in human DNA; prevent, diagnose and treat cancer; and prevail when the organs of the body begin to fail. Through these scenarios, students are exposed to a range of interventions related to immunology, surgery, genetics, pharmacology, medical devices, and diagnostics. The course is designed for 11th and 12th grade students.

Prerequisites: PBS and HBS or CP anatomy and Physiology, AP Biology or a combination of these classes and/or recommendation by instructor.

PLTW Biomedical Innovations (BI) : (S,T,E, M) - CAPSTONE

12th Grade
In the final course of the PLTW Biomedical Science sequence, students build on the knowledge and skills gained from previous courses to design innovative solutions for the most pressing health challenges of the 21st century. Students address topics ranging from public health and biomedical engineering to clinical medicine and physiology. They have the opportunity to work on an independent design project with a mentor or advisor from a university, medical facility, or research institution.

Prerequisites: PBS, HBS, MI completion with grade of A, B, or C.

Notes: A $40 materials fee will be charged for all PLTW Biomedical Sciences courses.

Concurrent college credit will be offered through UCCS – University of Colorado, Colorado Springs. There will be a fee associated with the college credit and will be set by UCCS.

ENGINEERING PATHWAY

The PLTW Engineering Program is a curriculum that is designed to encompass all four years of high school. Foundation courses are supplemented by a number of electives to create nine rigorous, relevant and reality-based courses.

PLTW: Project Lead the Way Introduction to Engineering Design: (IED) (S,T,E,M)

9th-12th Grade

The major focus of IED is the design process and its application. Through hands-on projects, students apply engineering standards and document their work. Students use industry standard 3D modeling software to help them design solutions to solve proposed problems, document their work using an engineer’s notebook, and communicate solutions to peers and members of the professional community.

PLTW: Project Lead the Way Principles of Engineering: (POE) (S,T,E,M)

10th-12th Grade

This survey course exposes students to major concepts they’ll encounter in a post-secondary engineering course of study. Topics include mechanisms, energy, statics, materials, and kinematics. They develop problem-solving skills and apply their knowledge of research and design to create solutions to various challenges, document their work and communicate solutions.

PLTW: Project Lead the Way Aerospace Engineering: (AE) (S,T,E,M)

11th-12th Grade

AE explores the evolution of flight, navigation and control, flight fundamentals, aerospace materials, propulsion, space travel, and orbital mechanics. In addition, this course presents alternative applications for aerospace engineering concepts. Students analyze, design, and build aerospace systems. They apply knowledge gained throughout the course in a final presentation about the future of the industry and their professional goals.

PLTW: Project Lead the Way Biotechnical Engineering: (BE) (S,T,E,M)

11th-12th Grade

In this course students explore the diverse fields of biotechnology. Hands-on projects engage students in engineering design problems related to biomechanics, cardiovascular engineering, genetic engineering, tissue engineering, biomedical devices, forensics and bioethics. Students, usually at the 11th and 12th grade level, apply biological and engineering concepts to design materials and processes that directly measure, repair, improve and extend living systems.

PLTW: Project Lead the Way Engineering Design & Development: (DD) (S,T,E,M)

12th Grade In this capstone course, students work in teams to design and develop an original solution to a valid open-ended technical problem by applying the engineering design process. Students perform research to choose, validate, and justify a technical problem. After carefully defining the problem, teams design, build, and test their solutions while working closely with industry professionals who provide mentoring opportunities. Finally, student teams present and defend their original solution to an outside panel.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT COMPUTER SCIENCE A: (APCSA) (S,T,E,M) (Weighted 5.0)

10th-12th Grade

Following the College Board's suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level computer science courses, AP Computer Science A courses introduce students to the fundamentals of computer science using the Java programming language. Students begin by programming virtual robots on screen, move into more programming basics and then on to writing full Java classes. Students also study the logic and structures around building those classes. By the end of the school year students should be able to write fully interactive programs in Java with the knowledge to adapt to other languages. AP Computer Science is the equivalent of an introductory college-level programming class and will prepare students for the AP exam where they can receive college credit for a qualifying score.

Prerequisites: A or B in CMIC 3 (or math instructor’s approval) AND Introduction to Engineering Design or AP Computer Science Principles

ADVANCED PLACEMENT COMPUTER SCIENCE PRINCIPLES: (APCSP) (S,T,E,M) (Weighted 5.0)

9th-12th Grade

AP Computer Science Principles can help students prepare for success not only in computer science majors and careers but also throughout a broad range of other fields and interests. Along with the fundamentals of computing, students will learn creative problem solving, how to apply computational processes to analyze large data sets, internet structures and important cyber security issues, and programming a global impacts of computing.

Future Offerings to complete the pathway:

Digital Electronics
Civil & Architectural Engineering
Computer Integrated Manufacturing
Engineering Design & Development


Social Studies

The Social Studies Department offers a variety of classes that are valuable to any student regardless of his or her goals.

Three credits of social studies must be earned in order to satisfy high school graduation requirements.

  • All freshmen must take Economics 9 and U.S. Government 9 or CP Economics 9 and CP U.S. Government 9. (Civics is a requirement for high school graduation and US Government satisfies this requirement.)
  • Sophomores must take World History and Geography or AP World History
  • U.S. History is required for graduation and should be taken during the junior year.
  • Students are encouraged to choose as many Social Studies electives as they may desire during their Junior and Senior years.

Courses with asterisk (*) indicate courses in which students may earn college credit.

SUGGESTED SOCIAL STUDIES COURSES:

The Northglenn High School Social Studies Department is proud to offer a variety of course selections that reflect the needs, interests, and abilities of a wide range of students. It is, therefore, very important that each individual carefully consider the alternatives available to make thoughtful choices. Each student should develop a three/four year plan of study. Please consider “Counseling Notes” after each course description very carefully.

SPECIAL NOTE: Students who take World Studies & Geography meet the Geography requirement for state colleges.

9th Grade Courses

U.S. GOVERNMENT   .5 credit

U.S. Government and is required for all 9th graders.  When 9th graders register for Social Studies, this course will be offered as a semester course. U.S. Government—Comprehensive courses provide an overview of the structure and functions of the U.S. government and political institutions and examine constitutional principles, the concepts of rights and responsibilities, the role of political parties and interest groups, and the importance of civic participation in the democratic process. These courses may examine the structure and function of state and local governments and may cover certain economic and legal topics. A passing grade is required for graduation.

Economics    .5 credit

Economics is a semester long course that covers the fundamentals of economic systems with a main focus on market economies.  Topics such as supply, demand, market competition, and economic cycles are related to consumer choice and current issues.  There will be a strong focus placed on personal finance. Topics such as saving, debt, and investing will be covered. Economics courses provide students with an overview of economics with primary emphasis on the principles of microeconomics and the U.S.economic system. These courses may also cover topics such as principles of macroeconomics, international economics, and comparative economics. Economic principles may be presented in formal theoretical contexts, applied contexts, or both.

CP GOVERNMENT 9 / CP Economics    1 credit

Students who want a more academically challenging course may elect CP Government/Economics. Students will be using more advanced level texts and primary source readings.  Content standards will be covered in more depth. Class activities may include seminars, panel presentations, debates, and research papers. This is a yearlong course. A passing grade for the government portion is required for graduation.


10th Grade Courses

WORLD HISTORY and GEOGRAPHY   1 credit

World History and Geography is a year-long course examining the major civilizations of past and present.  This course concentrates on humanity’s more significant political, economic, cultural, and intellectual achievements.  Content includes the ancient Near East, India, China, the classical world, the Middle Ages, and the modern world.  The impact of geography, nationalism, imperialism, and the rise of science are emphasized. World Geography courses provide students with an overview of world geography, but may vary widely in the topics they cover. Topics typically include the physical environment; the political landscape; the relationship between people and the land; economic production and development; and the movement of people, goods, and ideas. In addition to covering the objectives of World History—Overview courses, World History and Geography courses provide an overview of world geography. These courses are often developed in response to increased national concern regarding the importance of geography, and they explore geographical concepts.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT WORLD HISTORY*  1 credit weighted 5.0

Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level World History courses, AP World History courses examine world history from 8000 BCE to the present with the aim of helping students develop a greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contracts and how different human societies have interacted. These courses highlight the nature of changes in an international context and explore their causes and continuity.


11th Grade Courses 

U.S. HISTORY I AND II     1 credit 

Modern U.S. History courses examine the history of the United States from the Civil War or Reconstruction era (some courses begin at a later period) through the present time. These courses typically include a historical review of political, military, scientific, and social developments.United States History is a two-semester course in which the history and civilization of America are examined from a broad perspective.  The course focuses on analysis of important concepts, events, and people in the American experience.  Course activities and instruction are designed to develop further the academic skills which will help the student better comprehend this and other areas of study.  The student is asked to use the historical method and to examine carefully the social, political, and economic forces which shaped America. A passing grade is required for graduation.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT U.S. HISTORY*   1 credit (required)

Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level U.S. History courses, AP U.S. History courses provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to address critically problems and materials in U.S. history. Students learn to assess historical materials and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. The course examines the discovery and settlement of the New World through the recent past. A passing grade is required for graduation.


11th/12th Grade Courses

PSYCHOLOGY .5 credit

Psychology courses introduce students to the study of individual human behavior. Course content typically includes (but is not limited to) an
overview of the field of psychology, topics in human growth and development, personality and behavior, and abnormal psychology.
These courses examine a particular topic in psychology, such as human growth and development or personality, rather than provide a more comprehensive overview of the field.

SOCIOLOGY .5 credit

Sociology courses introduce students to the study of human behavior in society. These courses provide an overview of sociology, generally including (but not limited to) topics such as social institutions and norms, socialization and social change, and the relationships among individuals and groups in society.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT US GOVERNMENT*  1 credit weighted 5.0

Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level U.S. Government and Politics courses, these courses provide students with an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States, involving both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific case studies. The courses generally cover the constitutional underpinnings of the U.S. government, political beliefs and behaviors, political parties and interest groups, the institutions and policy process of national government, and civil rights and liberties.     Click here for site information.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT PSYCHOLOGY*   1 credit  weighted 5.0

Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel a college-level psychology course, AP Psychology courses introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals, expose students to each major subfield within psychology, and enable students to examine the methods that psychologists use in their science and practice.


 


SPECIAL EDUCATION (Student Support Services)

The Special Education program provides individualized and small group instruction for students who have documented disabilities and who need intensive interventions.  Collaboration with general education teachers and staff including co-teaching is an integral part of the program. Transition assessments, activities, and goals are also part of our programming at the high school level.

ENGLISH CLASSES

English I, II, III, IV

Focus of these courses will be on developing pre-reading and basic reading skills. They also include vocabulary development, basic communication skills, following directions and functional literacy skills. These classes are for students with significant support needs.

Voyager English I, II, III, IV

Appropriate for students with significant delays in decoding skills, comprehension skills, reading fluency, written expression, and basic writing skills. Voyager English I and Voyager English II are for students who need a structured multi-sensory reading program. Voyager English III and IV focus more on reading comprehension strategies and writing skills.

SOCIAL STUDIES CREDIT CLASSES

Social Studies I, II, III, IV

For students who need to learn basic community and social studies skills with modified curriculum. Students will also work on communication skills, functional literacy skills, and functional math skills within the context of social studies.  These classes are for students with significant support needs.

SCIENCE CREDIT CLASSES

Science I, II, II, IV

For students with significant support needs who need instruction in basic concepts of science with a modified curriculum. It includes the study of physical life and earth sciences with an emphasis on the nature of science and the everyday world.

MATH CLASSES

Math I, II, III, IV

Emphasis on basic math skills and functional math skills including development of number sequencing, number sense,
time, money, measurement and basic operations.  These classes are for students with significant support needs.

Foundation Math I, II

These classes will provide intensive math interventions using district approved curriculum with emphasis on
developing number sense and number concepts including developing skills in math calculation, math fluency, operations, fractions,
percentages, probability and statistics, algebra and geometry. Foundation II is a class designed to prepare students for success in CMIC I
offered through the math department.

Voyager Math

This will provide an intensive math intervention with further emphasis on developing number sense and number concepts
including developing skills in working with fractions, percentages, probability and statistics, algebra, formulas and geometry. Voyager
Math is for students who need to develop skills in number sense, and computation as well as operations involving fractions, decimals, and
percents.

ELECTIVE CREDIT CLASSES

Literacy Extensions

This class is designed to provide students with additional interventions in reading, writing, speaking and listening so they can develop the literacy skills needed to be successful in high school as well as post-secondary education and employment.

Math Extensions 

Students will have interventions and instruction in math calculation, math problems solving and study skills in order for them to develop  the math skills needed for CMIC math classes and other classes that need math skills such as science and career technical education classes.

Interpersonal Development I, II, III, or IV

Students learn and practice skills necessary for developing successful interpersonal relationships. Topics will include effective communication, listening skills, negotiation skills, stress management, conflict resolution, problem solving, healthy thinking, self-advocacy, decision making, and goal setting.

Life Skills I, II, III

Designed to prepare students with developmental and/or physical disabilities to live as independently as possible as adults. Instruction will include skills necessary in a variety of settings such as home, work and community. Topics may include: nutrition and food preparation, personal safety, clothing and grooming, relationships, simple first aid, recognition and use of money, communication and vocational skills. In addition to classroom instruction, students will use the kitchen to practice basic cooking and safety rules. Students may also have the opportunity for job training within the school environment. They may leave the school building for community activities. 


WORLD LANGUAGES

CONTENT STANDARDS

  1. Students comprehend spoken language though listening to the target language.
  2. Students communicate by speaking in the target language.
  3. Students comprehend written language through reading in the target language.
  4. Students communicate by writing in the target language.
  5. Students develop an acceptance of diversity through the exploration of cultures.
  6. Students use the target language to explore other content areas.
  7. Students extend acquired language and cultural experiences into everyday living.
  8. Students build self-concept and confidence in one’s ability to learn a language through successful classroom and life experiences.
  9. Students develop individual, self-directed language learning processes through interaction with another language.

Counseling Notes:

  1. World Language course offerings are sequential. Students MUST pass a prerequisite in order to advance to the next offering in that language.
  2. Four-year colleges (CDHE) require successful completion of two years of a world language. Check with potential colleges to find out their world language admittance requirements.
  3. AP classes are weighted.

FRENCH I

9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 (CDHE/NCAA-Academic Elective or CDHE Foreign Language)

In this beginning course, students will engage in Communication in French, Knowledge and Understanding of Other Cultures, making Connections with Other Disciplines, and Information Acquisition Comparisons to Develop Insight into the Nature of Language and Culture.  Collaborative communication practice will be emphasized to improve pronunciation and communicative competency. Class activities will involve individual and collaborative work primarily designed to develop listening and speaking ability.  Reading and writing activities will be used to reinforce oral skills.  Students will explore the cultures of French-speaking countries through a variety of student-centered, inquiry based activities focusing on food preparation, art, music projects and holiday celebrations in order to discover the similarities and differences of the French-speaking and world and other areas.  Students will develop confidence in their ability to learn a new language. This course also integrates STEM elements through using digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively in a student centered environment, including at distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.

FRENCH II

9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 (CDHE/NCAA-Academic Elective or CDHE Foreign Language)

French II continues to develop students’ skills in Communication in French, Knowledge and Understanding of Other Cultures, making Connections with Other Disciplines, and Information Acquisition Comparisons to Develop Insight into the Nature of Language and Culture.  Collaborative communication practice will be emphasized to improve pronunciation and communicative competency.  A student-centered, inquiry based approach to culture, communication, and comparison will be taken as students actively participate in hands-on activities, role-playing, and cultural simulations expanding their understanding of the similarities and differences of the French-speaking world. This course also integrates STEM elements through using digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively in a student centered environment, including at distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.

Prerequisite: French I or instructor approval upon completion of placement test.

FRENCH III

10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 (CDHE/NCAA-Academic Elective or CDHE Foreign Language)

Conversational competency and writing are the major emphasis in third-year French. Although Communication in French, Knowledge and Understanding of Other Cultures, making Connections with Other Disciplines, and Information Acquisition Comparisons to Develop Insight into the Nature of Language and Culture are practiced, special emphasis will be placed on the reading of brief, edited French classics, and the writing of short essays using elementary vocabulary. A student-centered, inquiry based approach to culture, communication, and comparison will be taken as students actively participate in oral and written work using more advanced grammar and vocabulary in role-playing skits and dialogues using 21st century technology skills. This course also integrates STEM elements through using digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively in a student centered environment, including at distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.

Prerequisite: French II or instructor approval upon completion of placement test.

FRENCH IV

11, 12 Credit: 1 (CDHE/NCAA-Academic Elective or CDHE Foreign Language)

Fourth-year French provides students the opportunity to master Communication in French, Knowledge and Understanding of Other Cultures, making Connections with Other Disciplines, and Information Acquisition Comparisons to Develop Insight into the Nature of Language and Culture. Classes are conducted in the language, and activities are designed to help students continue to develop their fluency and competence in French. The course includes a survey of the historical and cultural background of the French people as reflected in their art and literature, as well as an emphasis on current events and other French speaking countries. A student-centered, inquiry based approach to culture, communication, and comparison will be taken as students actively participate in oral and written work using more advanced grammar and vocabulary in role-playing skits and dialogues using 21st century technology skills. This course also integrates STEM elements through using digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively in a student centered environment, including at distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.

Prerequisite: French III or instructor approval upon completion of placement test.

SPANISH I

9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 (CDHE/NCAA-Academic Elective or CDHE Foreign Language)

Spanish I will provide the student with a general introduction to the Spanish language: sound system, pronunciation, functional vocabulary related to everyday life, cultural information and basic grammatical structures. Emphasis will be on the acquisition of four skills: listening, speaking, reading and limited writing. There are two main objectives to the course. Foremost is to give the students the ability to carry on a simple conversation. The second is to provide the students with instruction that teaches a basic understanding of Spanish culture, vocabulary, and grammatical concepts. This course also integrates STEM elements through using digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively in a student centered environment, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.

SPANISH II

9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 (CDHE/NCAA-Academic Elective or CDHE Foreign Language)

Spanish II builds upon knowledge gained in Spanish I. This course will also reinforce the skills learned in Spanish I: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Oral practice will be emphasized to improve pronunciation and communicative competency. Students will actively participate in hands-on activities, role-playing, and cultural simulations expanding their understanding of the similarities and differences of the Spanish-speaking world. Homework is given daily.

Emphasis is on perfecting pronunciation, mastery of the basic grammatical structures, and increased communicative proficiency. Acquisition of functional vocabulary is expected. Students will be exposed to the past and future tenses. Students will be expected to apply them in their writing and speaking. This course also integrates STEM elements through using digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively in a student centered environment, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.

Prerequisite: Spanish I or instructor approval upon completion of placement test.

SPANISH III

10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 (CDHE/NCAA-Academic Elective or CDHE Foreign Language)

This course builds upon knowledge gained in Spanish I & II. The course is a continuation and recycling of knowledge acquired in Spanish I and Spanish II, as well as an introduction to new vocabulary, structures and expressions. Students will be expected to expand their vocabulary range to include more sophisticated terms, use advanced language expressions, verb tenses and grammatical concepts such as the pluperfect and the subjunctive mood. Students will view Spanish language films and read selected Spanish literature. A student-centered, inquiry based approach to culture, communication, and comparison will be taken as students actively participate in oral and written work using more advanced grammar and vocabulary in role-playing skits and dialogues using 21st century technology skills. This course also integrates STEM elements through using digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively in a student centered environment, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish I & II, or instructor approval upon completion of placement test.

Counseling Note: Students need a comprehensive dictionary.

SPANISH IV

11, 12 Credit: 1 (CDHE/NCAA-Academic Elective or CDHE Foreign Language)

Spanish IV aims at developing and improving students’ oral and written communication through the continued study of the language, literature and culture of Spain, Latin America and Hispanic communities in the United States. It also seeks to improve students' ability to read and appreciate literary and non-literary texts in Spanish, deepening students' awareness and understanding of the cultural diversity of the Spanish-speaking world. The course is organized by themes based on contemporary social, political and cultural issues of Spanish-speaking societies such as: cultural identity, the changing roles of women and family, economic development and its effects on cultural heritage and environment, and the individual's rights in the political system. A student-centered, inquiry based approach to culture, communication, and comparison will be taken as students actively participate in oral and written work using more advanced grammar and vocabulary in role-playing skits and dialogues using 21st century technology skills. This course also integrates STEM elements through using digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively in a student centered environment, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish 1 2, &3, , or instructor approval upon completion of placement test.

Counseling Note: Students need a comprehensive dictionary.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT SPANISH

12 Credit: 1 (CDHE/NCAA-Academic Elective or CDHE Foreign Language)

(Weighted 5.0)

This AP Spanish Language and Culture course is conducted primarily in Spanish with authentic materials from the Spanish-speaking world, and it is equivalent to a third-year college course in Advanced Spanish Writing and Conversation. This course is designed to provide students with various opportunities to further improve their proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills to be ready for the AP Spanish Language and Culture Examination. The instructional philosophy of this course includes the integration of the four required language skills that are critical to the successful usage of Spanish: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. The general flow of each week’s work is comprised of vocabulary, grammar structure, literary analysis, application of passive and active vocabulary, supplementary reading, and finally, writing assignments and tests. Students should be able to achieve the following objectives:

To continue to develop communicative competence in these skills. To be able to understand the textbook lessons and supplementary materials and participate in discussions using the Spanish language. To be able to use the knowledge gained through course materials to develop critical thinking and writing skills to compose essays in Spanish on given topics. To be able to use the Spanish language to communicate effectively both in the school setting and in real-life situations. To be able to use Spanish as they seek clarifications through the use of communication and language learning strategies that are running elements of the course. To be able to carry on a conversation or a discussion with other students in class. The AP Spanish Language and Culture class will be conducted exclusively in Spanish. Students are required to speak Spanish as much as possible in the classroom and in Skype sessions. Students are also expected to read and write essays in Spanish on a weekly basis.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish I, II, III and IV, or instructor approval upon completion of placement test.

Counseling Notes:

  1. Students need a comprehensive dictionary.
  2. Northglenn High School requires all advanced placement students to take the AP exam. The current fee for each AP exam is $93.00, but is subject to change based on the College Board. Financial aid is available for students in need.

SPANISH FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS LEVEL 1

9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1(CDHE/NCAA-Academic Elective or CDHE Foreign Language)

Would you like to expand your Spanish skills and be considered bilingual in the professional world? This class is for the student who speaks but needs to improve reading and writing skills in Spanish. This class will teach you the basics of how to read and write in Spanish through the use of your oral language skills. In addition to the study of grammar, you will also study various topics including music, literature, current events and geography. Also, Spanish for Native Speakers I utilizes a student-centered, inquiry based approach to culture, communication, and comparison will be taken as students actively participate in oral and written work using more advanced grammar and vocabulary in role-playing skits and dialogues using 21st century technology skills. This course also integrates STEM elements through using digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively in a student centered environment, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.

Prerequisite: Student must complete a pre-assessment with a Spanish teacher to determine the correct level of placement. This year-long course cannot be repeated. Successful completion of this course is a prerequisite for Spanish for Native Speakers Level II.

ESPAÑOL PARA HISPANOHABLANTES NIVEL 1

9, 10, 11, 12 Crédito: 1

¿Le gustaría aumentar sus habilidades en español y ser considerado bilingüe en el mundo profesional? Este curso es para el estudiante que habla pero necesita mejorarse el escribir y leer en español. Le enseñará la estructura básica de como leer y escribir en español por

el uso de sus habilidades lingüísticas orales. Además de estudiar la gramática, también, estudiarás varios temas que incluyen la música, la literatura, los eventos corrientes y la geografía.

Requisito: Los estudiantes necesitan completar una evaluación con una profesora de español en el colegio de Northglenn para determinar el nivel correcto para ellos. El curso es de un año entero y no se permite repetirlo. Para seguir con el curso de Español para Hispanohablantes Nivel 2, necesitan cumplir con todos los requisitos de nivel uno según el profesor.

SPANISH FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS LEVEL 2

9, 10, Credit: 1(CDHE/NCAA-

Academic Elective or CDHE Foreign Language)

Explore the diverse world of Spanish language and its cultures! The goal is to improve your reading and writing skills in Spanish. This class is for students who can read and write in Spanish. You will study music, literature, geography, and history through group discussions, projects and presentations. Also, Spanish for Native Speakers 1 is a student-centered, inquiry based approach to culture, communication, and comparison will be taken as students actively participate in oral and written work using more advanced grammar and vocabulary in role-playing skits and dialogues using 21st century technology skills. This course also integrates STEM elements through using digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively in a student centered environment, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.

Prerequisite: Student must complete a pre-assessment with a Spanish teacher to determine the correct level of placement or have completed the Level 1 course. This year long course cannot be repeated.

ESPAÑOL PARA HISPANOHABLANTES NIVEL 2

9, 10, 11, 12 Crédito: 1

ESPAÑOL PARA HISPANOHABLANTES NIVEL II (Full Year)

¡Exploren el mundo diverso del idioma y sus culturas! La meta es mejorar cómo se escribe y lee en español. Este curso es para los estudiantes que ya pueden leer y escribir en español. Van a estudiar la música, la literatura, la geografía, y la historia a través de discusiones en grupo, proyectos y presentaciones.

Requisito: Los estudiantes necesitan completar una evaluación con una profesora de español en el colegio de Northglenn para determinar el nivel correcto para ellos o cumplir el curso de nivel 1. El curso es de un año entero y no se permite repetirlo.

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PDF icon NGHS 2018-2019 Registration Guide.pdf1.74 MB06/28/2018